Engineering Notices 

September 26, 2014: Recently CableOne in Boise realigned its channel lineup in order to make room for more channels. While Idaho Public Television channels were among those moved, only some CableOne subscribers "lost" us. That's because the change affects only those viewers with basic cable service and get that service without a set top box, i.e., they receive the CableOne feed via the QAM tuner in their digital television.

The new lineup is as follows; you'll need to re-scan in order to find us again:

  • IDPTV HD   101-474
  • Plus HD   90-470
  • Kids   78-471
  • Learn   78-472
  • World   78-473

If you have any additional questions please call our main office at 208-373-7220.


July 22, 2014: Our north Idaho field engineer was able to get to the site and make repairs on Monday.


July 18, 2014: We've just learned the Kellogg translator is down. Our north Idaho field engineer will make a trip to the site on Monday to determine the problem.


June 25, 2014: The piece of equipment that routes our signal from the KISU studio to the transmitter that serves eastern Idaho is having issues. Engineers are working to get it back up and running.


June 13, 2014: Two north Idaho translators are off the air. Engineers are attempting a repair to the Kamiah translator today. Repairs to the Kellogg translator will depend on mountain snow; we hope to get to the site within the next two weeks. **Repairs are complete and both the Kamiah and Kellogg translators are currently operational.


May 23, 2014: We think we finally know what the problem with the Council translator is: the amplifier has apparently quit running. We currently don't have the right parts available to effect a repair. However, we hope to get those parts and have them installed next week. We're very sorry for the inconvenience.


May 6, 2014: The Emmett translator is not functioning at all, so it will need a factory trip to get it repaired. Unfortunately, this means it may be a few weeks before we're able to get it back from the factory and into service again.


April 30, 2014: The good news is that the Council translator is back up and running. The bad news is it fixed itself! Our engineer did make a site visit, but because things were working when we got there, we're still unable to figure out why it has been quitting.


April 24, 2014: The outages at Council have been intermittent, so hard to pin down a cause for them. Our engineer will head to the site tomorrow for more troubleshooting and, with luck, repairs.


March 17, 2014: Turns out the culprit was a power failure at the Mica Peak microwave facility that relays our signal to the transmitter at Coeur d'Alene. The cause of the power outage was a bad transformer and damage somewhere to lines. The Department of Homeland Security had the microwave back up and running by mid-day Sunday.


March 15, 2014: KCDT-26 (Coeur d'Alene) is down due to a power issue on Mica Peak. The fix is ongoing, completion of repairs unknown. This outage affects all program streams north of Moscow including those to Dish & Directv and the cable companies.


December 11, 2013: A replacement power supply part arrived safely, and engineers were able to get to the transmitter site and install it. So as of yesterday afternoon, the KCDT (Coeur d'Alene) transmitter is back up to 100% power.


December 6, 2013: Last night the KCDT (Coeur d'Alene) transmitter lost one of its power supplies, so we are running at 50% power now.

Even at reduced power we are reaching the Sandpoint translator, the Dish and DirectTV satellite services, and the Spokane-area cable carriers OK, but may be losing a few viewers that are out on the farther reaches of our signal.

We will attempt to make repairs on Tuesday (12/10), assuming replacement parts delivery and weather cooperate.


November 25, 2013: Our translator on No Business Peak northwest of Donnelly is currently out of service. While we work to fix the situation, here's a possible solution: point your VHF antenna toward Brundage and look for us on digital channel 11 (you'll also find KTVB if you point toward that location). We'll post updated information here on this page as we learn it.


November 5, 2013: The KAID (Boise) transmitter is back on the air, but due to the failure of a piece of equipment, service to two translators — Table Rock, which covers a portion of northeast Boise; and Emmett — is still offline. We are working with the equipment manufacturer to troubleshoot the problem.


November 5, 2013: An equipment failure at the KAID (Boise) transmitter site has interrupted some services in southwest Idaho. The outage affects over-the-air viewers in the Treasure Valley as well as viewers whose signal originates from translators fed by the KAID transmitter. Engineers are headed to the transmitter site to troubleshoot the issue; we currently don't have an estimate as to when we'll be back on the air.


October 25, 2013: The Sandpoint translator is operating at very reduced power due to an equipment failure. We do not currently have an estimate on when it will be restored as we will likely have to send the amplifier in for repairs.


October 23, 2013: Avista returns for more tower work and will again be shutting off power to all facilities at Paradise Ridge, the location of our KUID transmitter, for two short periods on Wednesday, October 23. The first will start around 8:00 a.m. Pacific and last for 30–45 minutes; the second will occur around 5:00 p.m. Pacific and also last for 30–45 minutes.

These outages will affect Idaho Public Television viewers whose signal originates from KUID in Moscow, including over-the-air viewers of channel 12, cable customers in Moscow and Pullman (Time-Warner) and Lewiston (CableOne), and translator viewers in the communities of Kellogg, St. Maries, Lewiston, Juliaetta, Kamiah, Kooskia, Cottonwood and Grangeville.


October 21, 2013: Avista will be shutting off power to all facilities at Paradise Ridge, the location of our KUID transmitter, Tuesday, October 22 from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. PT while a crew re-guys a tower at that location.

This outage will affect Idaho Public Television viewers whose signal originates from KUID in Moscow, including over-the-air viewers of channel 12, cable customers in Moscow and Pullman (Time-Warner) and Lewiston (CableOne), and translator viewers in the communities of Kellogg, St. Maries, Lewiston, Juliaetta, Kamiah, Kooskia, Cottonwood and Grangeville.


October 18, 2013: Idaho Public Television engineers have successfully installed equipment at the Kamiah and Kooskia translator sites to provide digital signals to those areas.

The upgraded equipment will allow these north-central Idaho translators to send over-the-air digital signals that provide four digital channels of programming in place of the traditional single-analog channel.

The channel numbers for these new digital translators will remain the same — channel 11 for Kamiah and channel 5 for Kooskia. However, they will likely display in digital tuners as channel 12, since the translators are rebroadcasting our digital signal out of Moscow, where the call sign is KUID Ch. 12.

"Viewers who receive an over-the-air signal in the Kamiah and Kooskia areas will need to complete the conversion to digital television. They need either a television with a digital tuner or a set-top box for an analog TV," says IdahoPTV Director of Technology Rich Van Genderen. "And they need to scan for the new signal in each area, which is now divided into four subchannels that offer more and different programming than previously available. People who are prepared for the conversion in the translator's reception area should experience sharp, clear TV images from the new signals."

An antenna with UHF capability will still be required to capture the signal. "This is just like what people in these areas have been using for years. So anyone who has been receiving us before, should have no problem after the conversion," Van Genderen says.


October 7, 2013: The University of Idaho will again shut off power to selected campus buildings, including the Radio/TV Center, which houses KUID facilities, this Saturday, October 12th. Power could be off for up to six hours, from 6 a.m. to noon.

Our engineers will attempt to keep our equipment running using backup power sources. Any outages, should they occur, will affect Idaho Public Television viewers whose signal originates from KUID in Moscow, including over-the-air viewers of channel 12, cable customers in Moscow and Pullman (Time-Warner) and Lewiston (CableOne), and translator viewers in the communities of Kellogg, St. Maries, Lewiston, Juliaetta, Kamiah, Kooskia, Cottonwood and Grangeville.


October 4, 2013: The University of Idaho has notified us that they are shutting off power to selected campus buildings, including the Radio/TV Center, which houses KUID facilities, on two Saturdays, October 5th and 12th. Power could be off for up to six hours, from 6 a.m. to noon each day.

The outages will affect Idaho Public Television viewers whose signal originates from KUID in Moscow, including over-the-air viewers of channel 12, cable customers in Moscow and Pullman (Time-Warner) and Lewiston (CableOne), and translator viewers in the communities of Kellogg, St. Maries, Lewiston, Juliaetta, Kamiah, Kooskia, Cottonwood and Grangeville.


September 9, 2013: Thursday morning, September 12, we plan to shut off power to the KIPT transmitter on Jerome Butte. The interruption is necessary to install a transfer switch for a new emergency back-up generator system being installed at KIPT. The outage should begin at approximately 9:00 a.m. and last until approximately 2:00 p.m. Mountain time. It will affect the transmitter serving Twin Falls as well as the translators for Hagerman, Burley and the southern Wood River Valley (from Picabo Mountain). We apologize for the inconvenience.


August 1, 2013: Early Wednesday morning, August 7, between 3:30am MDT and 6:00am MDT, technicians will be performing maintenance on our statewide fiber optic distribution system that may cause signal outages to our transmitter, translator, cable and satellite feeds in North and East Idaho. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.


July 30, 2013: As of 11:10 am PDT the KUID transmitter is up and running. Service should be restored to all communities affected by the recent outage. Thank you for your patience and understanding.


July 29, 2013: All communities serviced by the Moscow transmitter remain off the air.

We are currently awaiting delivery of a part that is expected to arrive on Tuesday. Once installed, the power company will conduct tests and we will need to test components at the transmitter site to see if any additional damage has occurred.

We can confirm the following communities are affected: Moscow, Lewiston, Grangeville/Cottonwood, Kamiah, Kooskia, Juliaetta, St. Maries, Kellogg, Orofino, and Clarkston, WA.


July 28, 2013: For our viewers in the KUID area, we are experiencing problems with our transmitter. We expect to be off the air for at least a full day.

This issue is affecting over the air viewers including translators and feeds to local cable systems.

We can confirm the following communities are affected: Lewiston, Grangeville/Cottonwood, Kamiah, Kooskia, Juliaetta, St. Maries, and Kellogg


July 17, 2013: At approximately 9:36 p.m. last night (Tuesday, 7/16), Idaho Power's line voltage at east Butte went from the normal @121V up to 132V for about a minute. That resulted in a couple key power supplies in our KISU transmitter overloading and shutting down. An IdahoPTV engineer went to the transmitter site and restored power at @11:33 p.m., limiting the KISU outage to a couple hours.


July 8, 2013: The air conditioner cooling the KUID transmitter is now repaired, so the transmitter is back to full power. With this repair, all IdahoPTV transmitters are now running at their normal signal strengths.


July 6, 2013: IdahoPTV transmitters are currently running at the following reduced signal strengths:

  • Boise (KAID): 100% signal strength
  • Coeur d'Alene (KCDT): Normal
  • Moscow (KUID): 30% signal strength
  • Pocatello (KISU): Normal
  • Twin Falls (KIPT): Normal

Due to continued high temperatures, reception in areas with less than a full strength signal may be reduced.


July 3, 2013: IdahoPTV transmitters are currently running at the following reduced signal strengths:

  • Boise (KAID): 30% signal strength
  • Coeur d'Alene (KCDT): 100% signal strength
  • Moscow (KUID): 30% signal strength
  • Pocatello (KISU): Normal
  • Twin Falls (KIPT): Normal

Due to continued high temperatures, reception in areas with less than a full strength signal may be reduced.


July 3, 2013: AC systems continue to be compromised due to extreme heat; output power has been reduced to compensate. Some viewers may have difficulty receiving our signal if they have indoor antennas or are far away from transmission point. Replacement parts are on order and we hope to install them and restore full AC capacity on Saturday. If successful, we will ramp up output power at that time.


July 2, 2013: IdahoPTV transmitters are currently running at the following reduced signal strengths:

  • Boise (KAID): 30% signal strength
  • Coeur d'Alene (KCDT): 50% signal strength
  • Moscow (KUID): 50% signal strength
  • Pocatello (KISU): Normal
  • Twin Falls (KIPT): Normal

Due to continued high temperatures, reception in areas with less than a full strength signal may be reduced.


July 1, 2013: High temperatures have caused the KAID transmitter in Boise to overheat and go off the air. We are working to remediate the issue as quickly as possible. We apologize for the inconvenience.


July 1, 2013: Viewers in North Idaho may lose signal from Idaho Public Television this evening (7/1/13) and possibly tomorrow (7/2/13) as the record high temperatures have complicated previously scheduled repair work to HVAC systems at both sites. We are attempting to stay on the air with less than adequate output power to prevent total signal loss, but our efforts may result in loss of signal in some communities, especially those fed via translator. We regret this inconvenience and hope to be back to full operating power in a few days.


June 11, 2013: Engineers have replaced the amplifier on the Hagerman translator with a spare one. We'll fix the main one and swap it out with the spare in a week or two.


June 10, 2013: Tomorrow, Tuesday June 11, IDPTV engineers will be interrupting service to our Hagerman translator in order to remediate an issue with the radio power output, which has been low. We were notified about the problem last week and are now geared up to address it appropriately. We apologize for the service disruption but plan on it being very brief.


May 24, 2013: Last evening, Idaho State University technicians undertook some unannounced maintenance that ended up disrupting a fiber connection that relays our signal from the master control on campus out to the KISU transmitter. The outage lasted about 5 hours, from approximately 5:45 to 10:40 p.m. MT. We apologize for the inconvenience.


May 11, 2013: Last night around 6:20 p.m. MT our satellite receiver had electrical issues, causing us to miss the transmission of Washington Week and Need to Know. They were replaced with MacLaughlin Group and Consuelo Mack. Service was restored just before 8:00 p.m. MT. We apologize for the inconvenience.


April 4, 2013: IdahoPTV technicians have been able to restore over the air digital translator service to the communities of Challis, Salmon and Leadore. After a long and frustrating winter of failed repair attempts and band-aid fixes on the input microwave radio from Summit Reservoir to Challis, a local broadcaster, KIVI-TV, a Journal Broadcast Group station located in the Treasure Valley, loaned IdahoPTV a spare digital microwave they had that was perfect for our needs. After installing the microwave, making a few adjustments and confirming proper operation, the translator service was restored. IdahoPTV is extremely grateful to KIVI-TV for their generous loan of the microwave radio. We will use it while we await purchase and delivery of a permanent unit that we will hopefully have in hand by late summer.

Public Television relies on many partners to provide the great state of Idaho with quality programming and reliable signal delivery; we couldn't do our job without them and are most thankful to them!


April 4, 2013: Idaho Public Television has installed a new translator that now serves parts of the southern Wood River Valley. The new equipment provides a digital signal that should reach viewers in the valley's Bellevue triangle — the town of Bellevue and north to central Hailey, possibly even farther.

The new translator sends an over-the-air digital signal that is found on UHF Channel 22 and provides four subchannels of free IdahoPTV programming. An outdoor antenna with UHF capability, ideally mounted to the roof and pointed toward the Picabo Hills antenna farm, will be required to capture the signal, says Rich Van Genderen, Idaho Public Television's director of technology. Because of some terrain blockage, it is believed that Picabo residents will be unable to receive the signals from the new translator.

Idaho Public Television operates 43 translators statewide with the addition of the lower Wood River Valley operation.

If viewers are located in parts of the valley where they can't get IdahoPTV's over-the-air broadcasts, all four channels are now available via cable from Cox Communications.

The Robert Gardner family of Hailey has allowed Idaho Public Television to place the translator on their property, and Idaho Power provided assistance in the installation of the translator.

To help with the new service, Idaho Public Television engineers are looking for a few over-the-air Wood River Valley viewers who get their signal using an antenna in the new broadcast area, and who would be willing to e-mail IdahoPTV about reception issues should they occur. If interested, please call (208) 373-7220 and ask for engineering.


March 21, 2013: Power has been restored, so the Sandpoint, Bonners Ferry and Priest Lake translators, as well as the cable companies in those communities, are all back on the air.


March 21, 2013: The Sandpoint translator is off the air due to a possible power outage. This means we are also down at Bonners Ferry and Priest Lake, as well as the cable companies in those communities.


March 11, 2013: We have been scrounging for suitable replacement radios for the defective ones and have been to the mountain site a number of times trying out various radios in the hope they would work, but without luck so far. The good news is that a broadcaster in the Boise area has agreed to loan us a pair of radios that are fairly new, so they should work. The only issue is that they are on mountain tops over in the Boise area and we have to go retrieve them. Our engineers in Boise will be doing so at first opportunity, which we hope will be this week some time. Assuming that happens, we would expect to be able to get them installed sometime next week and restore service to Salmon and Challis.

We have a couple of options for permanent fixes, at least one of which we'll have available late next summer, so getting these loaner radios that we can use in the meantime is just what we needed.


February 8, 2013: Wednesday morning February 6th, the technicians from the Pocatello office were readying their equipment for an attempt to once again restore service to Challis, Salmon and Leadore. We believe they have a viable "short term" fix for the non-functional microwave radio that is causing the current outage. As fate would have it, we had one more failure to delay our return to the sites with our patch . . .

The axle sheared off on the trailer just as they left the shop! We hope to get a replacement in a few days and try again next week. We are trying!!!


January 30, 2013: The translator at Cottonwood Butte is off the air. Engineers will attempt to get to the site tomorrow (Thur., Jan. 31), weather permitting. This outage affects Cottonwood, Grangeville, Kamiah & Kooskia (plus surrounding areas).


January 30, 2013: Salmon/Challis update: The repairs we attempted with the failed microwave on the bench have not worked. The old unit is simply not reliable for digital signal carriage and repair parts have not improved its performance. We are actively investigating signal delivery options. We appreciate your patience and apologize for the inconvenience.


January 22, 2013: Salmon/Challis update: We're sorry to report that the used oscillator we found to replace the broken one in the Summit Reservoir microwave unit does not work.

So, on to Plan B: Engineers have located and borrowed a full radio unit from another broadcaster. They are in the process of testing the unit "on the bench." If it works there, they will look at scheduling a time to install it on site at Summit Reservoir, weather permitting.


January 14, 2013: The microwave link between Summit Reservoir and Grouse Peak (near Challis) is down. This means that no broadcast signal is reaching the translators for Challis, Salmon, and Leadore.

After troubleshooting visits to both locations, our engineers have determined that the oscillator from the Summit Reservoir microwave unit is broken and beyond repair. Since the unit is so old, the original manufacturer is no longer in business and replacement parts are no longer being produced. Absent a replacement part, or a whole new unit (which we currently don't have the budget for), we have tried several alternative signal delivery methods, but so far none have been successful.

Prospects for restored service in the near future are finally looking up. We have just located a used replacement oscillator, and weather permitting, engineers will try to get it installed this week. But as always, winter plans are subject to the whims of mother nature. In the last month since finding the unit dead, our engineers have ended up stranded on both mountains. The snow cat we used to reach the microwave at Grouse Peak broke an axle. Our engineers had to be brought down the mountain by search and rescue personnel; the snow cat remains on the mountain. On their most recent visit to Summit Reservoir last week, engineers encountered whiteout conditions when they got ready to leave and had to spend the night in the equipment building; next morning the weather cleared and they were able to get off the mountain safely.


December 7, 2012: IdahoPTV engineers report that as of around noon today, service from the translators serving the McCall area — Brundage and No Business Peak — has been restored.


December 6, 2012: Both translators serving the McCall area — Brundage and No Business Peak — are down. Cause of the outage is still unknown at this time.


December 5, 2012: SuddenLink Cable reports that they are once again receiving a signal from our Kellogg translator.


November 30, 2012: The Kellogg outage affects viewers who receive us over the air and on SuddenLink cable. Given the amount of snow reported at the translator site, our field engineers aren't sure when they'll be able to get up there to troubleshoot the issue.


November 27, 2012: Our north Idaho field engineer reports that as of Tuesday afternoon, Nov. 27, the Priest Lake translator is back in service and on the air.


November 26, 2012: Viewers report that they are no longer receiving a signal from the Salmon translator. An IdahoPTV engineer is headed to the site (Monday, 11/26) to troubleshoot the issue.


November 19, 2012: IdahoPTV engineers report that, as of mid-day Monday, translators serving the McCall area — Brundage and No Business Peak — are back on the air.


November 16, 2012: Both translators serving the McCall area — Brundage and No Business Peak — are down. Cause of the outage is still unknown at this time.


November 6, 2012: The Priest Lake translator has been taken out of service and brought back to the KUID facilities for repair. Cause of the outage is still unknown at this time.


October 1, 2012: To accommodate an electrical panel upgrade, Idaho Public Television engineering staff members and contractors plan a Network Operations Center (NOC) power outage at 12 midnight/11 p.m. MT/PT on Monday, October 8.

Because of the outage, all of IdahoPTV's channels across all stations will be off the air for the first hour or so of Tuesday, October 9.

"This outage should be brief, but the time required to restore all services to all of the state program delivery systems may be on the order of two or three hours," says Rich Van Genderen, IdahoPTV's director of technology. "We apologize for this inconvenience."


August 24, 2012: Our engineers report that maintenance on the Boise broadcast tower is complete and that as of 8:45 p.m. MT Thursday evening, KAID is transmitting at full power once again.


August 20, 2012: On Friday evening, August 17, problems in our Master Control led to loss of service during the broadcasts of "Need to Know" and "Foyle's War."

Viewers will have the opportunity to catch up on the missed episode of Foyle's War ("The German Woman - Part 1" [#101]) early Friday morning, August 24 at 1:00 a.m. Mountain / 12:00 a.m. Pacific.


August 6, 2012: Please be aware that our Boise transmitter, KAID, is operating at low power for the next few weeks to allow for needed maintenance on the broadcast tower located on Deer Point (Bogus Basin). In addition, our tower partners, KBOI-TV, et al., will also be operating at low power. We anticipate that normal, full-power broadcasts will be resumed by August 31.

Viewers with cable or satellite service should not notice any change in their quality of service from IdahoPTV. Viewers who receive their signal from an antenna may notice more "tiling" or signal loss during this period of time. Wind and adverse weather may also cause our signal to be affected. Finally, viewers who live on our fringe coverage areas may not receive any signal at all until full-power operation resumes.


August 6, 2012: On Friday evening, August 3, the microwave facility at Cottonwood that helps relay our signal to north Idaho encountered a problem and went dark. This caused all receivers that get their signal from KUID or KCDT (over-the-air, cable, satellite) to lose their programming for about 3 1/2 hours until microwave service was restored.

Viewers will have the opportunity to catch up on the missed episode of Foyle's War ("Casualties of War, Part 1" [#407]) early Friday morning, August 10 at 1:00 a.m. Mountain / 12:00 a.m. Pacific.


July 26, 2012: The translator at Sandpoint is back on the air. A bad battery backup was removed and service was restored.


July 25, 2012: The translator at Sandpoint is off the air. This outage also affects the Bonners Ferry and Priest Lake areas. Our field engineer will attempt to restore service as soon as possible.


July 16, 2012: Due to a commercial power spike at the KISU (Pocatello) transmitter, Friday evening's program schedule was unavailable to viewers. We have re-scheduled two of that evening's programs for early Friday morning, July 20:

  • Foyle's War: "Bad Blood, Part 2" (#404) — 1:00 a.m. MT/12:00 a.m. PT
  • Midsomer Murders: "Ring Out Your Dead, Part 2" (#504) — 2:00 a.m. MT/1:00 a.m. PT

In addition, recent episodes of Foyle's War, including July 13th's missed show, can be viewed in our online video player.


July 3, 2012: Distribution of programming for the Learn/Create channel is still disrupted, and we still don't have an estimate as to when it will be fixed. On the plus side: programming on World is back to normal!


July 2, 2012: This past weekend's severe weather on the East coast, and the resulting extensive power outages, has disrupted the distribution of programming for both the Learn/Create and World channels to PBS stations around the country. Engineers are aware of the problem and are working to return operations back to normal.


March 17, 2012: This morning the KIPT (Twin Falls) transmitter tripped off on us. We were unable to raise it or get response from it remotely. So Craig (engineer) drove over to KIPT to investigate. Needless to say it is pouring rain over there, and we have apparently had a leak of some kind in one of our antenna bays. This is causing extremely high reflected power down the transmission line, high enough to trip the transmitter off unless we run less than 40% output. We'll have to hope for some good weather next week to get some tower monkeys over there to see if they can find the problem and effect a repair.


March 9, 2012: It appears that the microwave which feeds the translator serving Emmett is acting up intermittently. We have a call in to the manufacturer for a loaner, but do not have an E.T.A. as to when the replacement will arrive.


March 2, 2012: We've received notice that the St. Maries translator is back on the air, perhaps of its own volition, or maybe with the help of a power reset. At any rate, we've thankfully avoided a helicopter ride to get to the snowed-in site.


February 28, 2012: We've received notice that due to multiple power interruptions on Saturday night, the St. Maries translator is off the air. An engineer will attempt to restore service as soon as possible.


February 9, 2012: The microwave that feeds the translator had shut down up on Deer Point. We've yet to figure out why, but it is working again. We will keep looking into it so we can find the root cause and address it.


February 8, 2012: We've received notice that the translator serving Emmett is off the air. An engineer will attempt to get to the Emmett site as soon as possible.


January 26, 2012: We've received notice that Utah Power has restored service to the Soda Springs translator. Because that translator also feeds translators at Georgetown, Montpelier, Lava Hot Springs, and Preston, service to those communities should all now be restored as well.


January 23, 2012: A power outage at the Soda Springs translator has knocked it off the air. Because that translator also feeds translators at Georgetown, Montpelier, Lava Hot Springs, and Preston, service to those communities is affected as well. An engineer will attempt to get to the Soda Springs site as soon as possible. Update (1:00 p.m.): The power company hopes to have power restored to the site by the end of today.


January 19, 2012: At about 5:34 p.m. PST we lost power at the Moscow transmitter causing IdahoPTV to be off the air in north-central Idaho from the Silver Valley through Grangeville. Avista (as of 8:30 a.m. Friday) estimates restoration time will be around 12:30 p.m. PST.


January 4, 2012: We have received confirmation from a local viewer and the cable company that power has been restored and the St. Maries translator is back on the air.


January 4, 2012: Because of a heavy windstorm, the St. Maries translator is temporarily down. Technicians are working to remedy the situation as soon as possible.


December 5, 2011: The Sandpoint translator is back on the air. Translators and cable systems serving Sandpoint, Bonners Ferry, Priest Lake, and Priest River should once again have the IdahoPTV signal.

Our north Idaho field engineer finally got a helicopter ride to the top of Sandpoint Baldy and got the translator back on the air. It had shut itself down due to high icing on the antenna. The resets designed into the translator didn't address that particular fault, so the engineer added a power reset to whole transmitter to address that fault in the future.


November 23, 2011: The Sandpoint translator is down. This means that translators and cable systems serving Sandpoint, Bonners Ferry, Priest Lake, and Priest River will be without service until the Sandpoint translator is fixed. We won't have an estimate on repair time until an engineer is able to get to the site.


September 23, 2011: Idaho Public Television engineers have successfully installed equipment at the Sandpoint, Priest Lake, and Bonners Ferry translators to provide digital signals to those respective areas.

The upgraded equipment will allow these north Idaho translators to send over-the-air digital signals that provide four digital channels in the place of the traditional single-analog channel.

The new Sandpoint digital signal, which covers parts of the Priest River area, appears on most digital television sets and digital set-top boxes as channel 30, which is a change from the analog channel 16. The new digital signal for Priest Lake, which covers Coolin and lower Priest Lake, appears as channel 42, which is the same channel previously used by the analog signal. And the new digital signal for Bonners Ferry will appear on most digital television sets and digital set-top boxes as channel 44, which is a change from the analog channel 23.

"Viewers who receive an over-the-air signal in the Sandpoint, Priest Lake, and Bonners Ferry areas will need to complete the conversion to digital television. They need either a television with a digital tuner or a set-top box for an analog TV," says IdahoPTV Director of Technology Rich Van Genderen. "And they need to scan for the new signal in each area, which is now divided into four subchannels that offer more and different programming than previously available. People who are prepared for the conversion in the translator's reception area should experience sharp, clear TV images from the new signals."

An antenna with UHF capability will still be required to capture the signal. "This is just like what people in these areas have been using for years. So anyone who has been receiving us before, should have no problem after the conversion," Van Genderen says.


August 12, 2011: Idaho Public Television engineers have successfully installed equipment at the McCall/New Meadows translator on Brundage Mountain to provide a digital television signal to the area.

The upgraded Brundage Mountain translator will now send an over-the-air digital signal that provides four digital channels in place of the single traditional analog channel.

The new digital signal will appear on most digital television sets and digital set-top boxes as channel 11, which is a change from the current channel 5.

A translator on No Business Peak already reaches some parts of McCall and will continue to do so on channel 41. The Brundage Mountain installation will provide a digital signal to much of the northern end of McCall and to New Meadows.

"Viewers who receive an over-the-air signal in the McCall area will need to complete their conversion to digital television. They need either a television with a digital tuner or a set-top box for an analog TV," says IdahoPTV Director of Technology Rich Van Genderen. "And they need to scan for the new signal, which is usually seen as channel 11, but is divided into four sub-channels, each offering different programming, instead of just one channel. People who are prepared for the conversion in the translator's reception area should experience sharp, clear TV images from the new signal."

An antenna with UHF capability will still be required to capture the signal. "This is just like what people in the area have been using for years. So anyone who has been receiving us before, should have no problem after the conversion," Van Genderen says.

Viewers with questions or in need of assistance can call Idaho Public Television's Boise office at 373-7220 or 1-800-543-6868 during business hours 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.


July 2011: Idaho Public Television engineers successfully converted translators for the north Idaho communities of St. Maries and Kellogg from analog to digital service. The conversion will make it possible for viewers to receive all four IdahoPTV digital channels — Idaho, HD, Learn/Create, and World.

The digital service will show up on sets and guides as channels 23-1 through 23-4 (St. Maries), 49-1 through 49-4 (Kellogg), or 12-1 through 12-4 (both areas).

Viewers with newer television sets will likely only have to do a channel re-scan in order to find us after the conversion, since their TVs have a digital tuner built in. Viewers with older analog sets can simply get a converter box that will pick up the new digital signal and convert it to a form their analog sets can understand. Viewers who already have a converter box will only need to do a channel re-scan.

Viewers with questions or in need of assistance can call Idaho Public Television's Moscow office at 208-885-1226 or 1-800-424-1226 during business hours 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.


June 2011: Sometime next week, June 20 – June 23, Idaho Public Television engineers will convert the translators serving the north-central Idaho communities of Juliaetta and Cottonwood/Grangeville from analog to digital service. The conversion will make it possible for viewers to receive all four IdahoPTV digital channels — Idaho, HD, Learn/Create, and World.

The digital service will show up on sets and guides as channels 43-1 through 43-4 (Juliaetta), 46-1 through 46-4 (Cottonwood/Grangeville), or 12-1 through 12-4 (both areas).

Viewers with newer television sets will likely only have to do a channel re-scan in order to find us after the conversion, since their TVs have a digital tuner built in. Viewers with older analog sets can simply get a converter box that will pick up the new digital signal and convert it to a form their analog sets can understand. Viewers who already have a converter box will only need to do a channel re-scan.

Viewers with questions or in need of assistance can call Idaho Public Television's Moscow office at 208-885-1226 or 1-800-424-1226 during business hours 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.


August 2010: This summer, Idaho Public Television engineers will convert the translators serving the eastern Idaho communities of Driggs, Burley, and Malta from analog to digital service. The conversion will make it possible for viewers to receive all four IdahoPTV digital channels — Idaho, HD, Learn/Create, and World.

Work on the translator near Grand Targhee Ski Resort east of Driggs, completed August 19, means IdahoPTV is now sending a digital signal to an area that includes Driggs, Victor and Tetonia. The new signal appears on digital television sets and digital set-top boxes as channel 13, the same channel used by the former analog service.

Work on the translator on Old Beacon Hill southeast of Burley will result in a digital signal covering an area that includes Burley, Heyburn, Rupert and Paul. The new digital signal will appear on digital television sets and digital set-top boxes as channel 13, in place of the former analog channel 14.

Engineers also are changing the equipment on Cotterell Mountain, northwest of Malta, for a signal to cover Malta and Albion. This signal will also appear on digital television sets and digital set-top boxes as channel 13.

"Viewers who receive an over-the-air signal in the Driggs, Victor and Tetonia areas need to complete the conversion to digital television. They need either a television with a digital tuner or a set-top box for an analog TV," says IdahoPTV Director of Technology Rich Van Genderan. "After the conversion, they will need to scan for the new signal, which will be seen as channel 13, but will be divided into four sub-channels, each offering different programming, instead of just one channel. People who are prepared for the conversion in the translator's reception area should experience sharp clear TV images when the digital signal begins."


May 11, 2010: Idaho Public Television engineers have repaired and reinstalled the translator on Mount Baldy outside Salmon, and the translator is back in operation.

The translator, which was out of commission for approximately five weeks, first became inoperative after a spring storm swept through the area. The resulting snow barred access to the mountain until late last month, leaving the Salmon area without an IdahoPTV signal until this week.


May 4, 2010: Our St. Maries translator is down. There was a power outage on St. Joe Baldy last night due to the heavy winds and the building generator failed to come on. The power is now back, but not our translator. There is an outside chance it may come back on with a DTV receiver power reset at approximately 4:00 p.m. PT. If not, I have further issues. This is not a winter-friendly site, so I will have to do some planning if a trip to the site is needed. [Mike Cramblit]


May 4, 2010: Idaho Public Television engineers are working to repair and reinstall needed parts to put the translator on Mt. Baldy outside Salmon back into operation.

Rich Van Genderen, director of technology for IdahoPTV, says the translator, which has been out of commission for approximately four weeks, first became inoperative after a spring storm swept the area. The resulting snow barred access to the mountain until April 27, leaving the Salmon area without an IdahoPTV signal.

"Because the microwave receiver was not working, the part was brought back to Boise for parts and repair," Van Genderen says. "But the problem has turned out to be at the microwave transmitter site on Grouse Peak outside of Challis."

Engineers anticipate returning to reinstall the newly serviced receiver to Baldy and then travel to Grouse Peak to repair the microwave transmitter by May 15.

"IdahoPTV certainly appreciates the patience of the great viewers in the Salmon area, and we apologize that this has been such a long outage," Van Genderen says. "Travel into high mountain sites without 'application specific' vehicles, such as Snow Cats, has always been somewhat of a gamble. Sometimes it can take a while for site conditions to stabilize enough to allow safe access.

"The need for safety, coupled with limited financial resources force us at times to take much longer to get mountain access than we would prefer. We don't like this situation any more than the viewers do."


April 27, 2010: Our field engineer, John "JD" Davis, phoned in from Salmon this morning and said that while they were able to get to the mountain, it was extremely tough and hazardous. The guys who took him in suggested they get the heck out of there ASAP or risk being stuck for a long couple of days.

That being said, the microwave that feeds into the site is kaput. We do not know which end has died at this point, and of course, the other end is at Challis, which will also be a bear to get into. JD will try to bring the microwave receiver down with him for testing, and then we will evaluate how we get back up there. It may very well be that when the weather breaks, we will hire a helicopter to drop off one technician at Challis and one at Salmon Baldy. Or, we may wait until we can drive in, possibly around late May, early June.

The Salmon translator has already been down about a month now. This site is just a very nasty one to get to in this time of transition from deep snow to slush to mud. The gents who took JD in said they won't be able to get in again via snow machine — the slush is just too bad and the mud will only get worse for a while. The description was, Picture yourself trying to drive a snow machine across a lake that is full of crushed ice. One slip up and you are in deep!!!

We'll let you know more as we get it. This digital microwave transition can't happen soon enough!!!


February 3, 2010: For viewers of our over-the-air digital signal: We have had some data errors in our broadcast stream in the last few days. Some receivers ignore these errors; others do not. If you have recently lost the IdahoPTV digital signal for all four channels (Idaho, HD, Learn, and World), please perform a re-scan of your available channels, and that should re-train your tuner's brain to see us again.