NEVER SAY QUIT
                          OUTDOOR IDAHO


OLIVE PURCELL:
WAY UP.  GET AWAY UP THERE.  

I NEVER WANTED TO GET FAMOUS.  I NEVER WANTED TO GET RICH.  I
JUST WANT TO GET ALONG.

KENNETH SEID:
WELL, IF I'D LET HER, SHE'D WORK EVERY DAY OF THE YEAR AND FROM
DAYLIGHT 'TILL DARK.

BRUCE REICHERT, HOST:
THERE ARE SOME PEOPLE FOR WHOM A NINE TO FIVE JOB WOULD AMOUNT TO
A PRISON SENTENCE. 

HORACE HENDERSON:
I CAN'T JUST SIT DOWN.  I'VE GOT TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO.  I
WORKED ALL MY LIFE AND IF I JUST QUIT, I WOULDN'T LAST THREE
MONTHS.  I'D BE DEAD.

REICHERT:
FOR THEM, TIME HAS LITTLE MEANING WHEN THEY'RE IN THE OUTDOORS.

DOTTIE FOX:
IT'S A PLACE THAT I GO TO, WHEN I, IF I HAVE A PROBLEM, IF I'M
UPSET, IF I'M SAD.  I WILL GO OUT AND TAKE A HIKE IN THE
WILDERNESS.

PAUL PETZOLDT:
YOU SEE, I LIKE TO CLIMB BECAUSE I LIKE TO SEE THINGS, LIKE
CLIMBING THE GRAND TETON.

REICHERT:
THEIR LIVES HAVE BEEN ADVENTURES, AND THEY'RE NOT ABOUT TO QUIT
NOW, JUST BECAUSE THEY'VE GOTTEN OLDER.

FRANK GILLETTE:
I STILL DO THE THINGS I'VE BEEN DOING ALL MY LIFE, AT A DIFFERENT
PACE.  BUT BEING OUT IN THE OUTDOORS I THINK KEEPS YOU YOUNG. 
MAYBE PEOPLE DON'T WANT TO BE YOUNG, BUT I DO.

REICHERT:
THEY SAY THAT YOU'RE NOT REALLY OLD UNTIL REGRETS TAKE THE PLACE
OF DREAMS.  GROWING OLD GRACEFULLY AND WITH A SENSE OF PURPOSE. 
IT MAY BE THE HARDEST PART OF THIS BUSINESS CALLED LIVING.

HI, I'M BRUCE REICHERT AND WELCOME TO OUTDOOR IDAHO.

WE ALL GROW OLD.  IT'S HOW WE DO IT THAT DIFFERS.

RESEARCH INDICATES THAT STAYING INVOLVED WITH THE THINGS ONE
LOVES IS THE SUREST WAY TO GUARANTEE A FULL AND EVEN A LONGER
LIFE.  WE'RE GOING TO INTRODUCE YOU TO SOME FOLKS WHO HAVE DONE
JUST THAT, WHO HAVE STAYED CLOSE TO THE THINGS THEY LOVE, FOR
WHOM THE OUTDOORS IS A DAILY INSPIRATION, A TONIC TO SHIELD THEM
AGAINST THE PASSAGE OF TIME.

PAUL PETZOLDT, MOUNTAINEER:
THIS IS JUST LIKE HOME.

REICHERT:
THIS IS WHERE PAUL PETZOLDT GOT HIS START.  IN HIS 88 YEARS, HE
WOULD SCALE SOME OF THE WORLD'S HIGHEST PEAKS AND PIONEER MANY OF
THE MOUNTAINEERING SKILLS STILL USED TODAY.

NOW NEARLY BLIND, PETZOLDT USES A CHAIR LIFT TO REACH FAMILIAR
GROUND.

PETZOLDT:
THIS IS MY BACKYARD, THIS IS, THAT'S REALLY A GOOD WAY TO
DESCRIBE THIS, MY BACKYARD.  AND I CAME HERE AS A TEEN AND THIS
IS WHERE I GREW UP.  

REICHERT:
PETZOLDT'S CLIMB TO FAME STARTED WHEN HE WAS JUST 16.  IN 1924,
HE AND HIS FRIEND, RALPH HERRON, VISITED JACKSON HOLE, WYOMING.  

PETZOLDT:
WHEN WE CAME AROUND THERE, WE REMEMBERED WHAT WE HAD READ ABOUT
CLIMBING IN THE ALPS AND THOSE THINGS, AND HERE THESE, THIS LOOKS
LIKE THE MATTERHORN.  AND SO WE JUST SORT OF NATURALLY SAID,
"LET'S CLIMB IT."  AND SO WE JUST WALKED ON AND THAT WAS IT, WE
STARTED TALKING ABOUT CLIMBING THE GRAND TETON.

REICHERT:
ONLY A HANDFUL OF PEOPLE HAD EVER CLIMBED TO THE TOP OF THE
13,700 FOOT SUMMIT OF THE GRAND TETON.  IGNORING THE ADVICE OF
THE ONLY MAN AROUND WHO HAD ACTUALLY REACHED THE TOP, AND DEFYING
THE LOCAL SHERIFF'S WARNINGS, THE TWO TOOK OFF UP THE MOUNTAIN. 
THE FIRST NIGHT THEY FOUND THEMSELVES TRAPPED BY A VIOLENT STORM,
UNABLE TO MOVE.

PETZOLDT:
I SAY FACETIOUSLY THAT THE ONLY REASON WE WERE STILL ALIVE
BECAUSE HYPOTHERMIA WASN'T IN THE DICTIONARY THEN.

REICHERT:
THEY DID SURVIVE AND MADE IT TO THE TOP.  IT WAS A MOMENT THAT
CHANGED PETZOLDT'S LIFE.

PETZOLDT:
AND I LEARNED IN THE MOUNTAINS YOU'VE GOT TO MAKE THE RIGHT
DECISIONS.  IF YOU DON'T, YOU DON'T LIVE.  LOOK AT THE DECISION
WE MADE ON THAT EAST FACE.  WHY SHOULD WE WANT TO CLIMB THE EAST
RIDGE?  THOSE DECISIONS WERE MADE ON IGNORANCE.  AND YOU CAN'T
GET BY IN LIFE MAKING DECISIONS UNLESS THEY ARE BASED ON REALITY. 
SO THAT IS WHAT I STARTED TO DO.

REICHERT:
PETZOLDT BECAME THE TETONS' PREMIERE MOUNTAIN GUIDE, EVENTUALLY
JOINING UP WITH A FRIEND TO START THE PETZOLDT/EXUM CLIMBING
SCHOOL.  HIS EXPLOITS IN THE TETONS BECAME LEGENDARY.

PETZOLDT:
SOMEBODY SAID THAT I CLIMBED IT 400 TIMES.  I THINK MAYBE THAT'S
TOO MANY.  I KNOW ONE TIME I CLIMBED IT SEVEN TIMES IN SEVEN
DAYS, BECAUSE EVERYONE WANTED ME AS A GUIDE SO I JUST STAYED
TIMBERLINE AND LET GLEN EXUM OR SOME OF THE PEOPLE I WAS TRAINING
BRING THEM UP TO ME.  I'D SAY, "BRING UP THE VICTIMS, I'LL TAKE
THEM UP TO THE TOP."

REICHERT:
IN 1938, PETZOLDT JOINED THE FIRST AMERICAN EXPEDITION TO K-2,
THE WORLD'S SECOND HIGHEST MOUNTAIN.  HE REACHED THE EXPEDITION'S
HIGHEST POINT OF 26,000 FEET WITHOUT THE USE OF OXYGEN.  

AND, DURING WORLD WAR II, PETZOLDT TAUGHT SURVIVAL SKILLS TO THE
10TH MOUNTAINEERING DIVISION.

PETZOLDT:
AND THEN THERE'S A SERIES OF CRACKS YOU CAN GO ON.  BUT DURING
THE TIME WE'VE WORKED OUT VARIOUS SYSTEMS OR ROUTES THAT GO ON TO
THE SUMMIT.

REICHERT:
AFTER THE WAR, PETZOLDT DEDICATED HIS LIFE TO CLIMBING AND TO
TEACHING.  HE FOUNDED THE NATIONAL OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP SCHOOL -
NOLS, AND THE WILDERNESS EDUCATION ASSOCIATION.  PETZOLDT ARGUES
THAT BACKCOUNTRY USERS HAVE TO BE TRAINED BEFORE GOING INTO THE
WILDERNESS.

PETZOLDT:
REALLY, THEY DON'T HAVE THE MORAL AND ETHICAL RIGHT OF GOING
THERE UNLESS THEY KNOW HOW TO USE THE COUNTRY WITH VERY LITTLE
HARM TO THE BEAUTY AND THE ECOSYSTEMS.

REICHERT:
WHILE PETZOLDT HAS WORKED HARD TO PROTECT WILDERNESS, HE SHUNS
THE ENVIRONMENTALIST LABEL.

PETZOLDT:
WE'VE GOT TO START TALKING TO THE CATTLE RANCHERS, AT LEAST THE
FOREST SERVICE.  WE'VE GOT TO START TALKING TO THE LUMBERMEN. 
THERE'S PROBABLY A PLACE FOR EVERYTHING.

TOURIST:
THERE USED TO BE WONDERFUL FISH IN THERE.

WE ALWAYS HAD FANTASTIC FISHING, NEVER DID MISS.
REICHERT:
PETZOLDT NOW CRISS-CROSSES THE COUNTRY ON A LECTURE TOUR AND
WRITES BOOKS.  BUT HE'S NEVER VERY FAR FROM HIS MOUNTAINS.

SEVENTY-FIVE YEARS AFTER PETZOLDT'S FIRST CLIMB OF THE GRAND
TETON, HE AND A FEW FRIENDS TRIED IT AGAIN.

THEY DIDN'T MAKE IT ALL THE WAY TO THE TOP.  HE SAYS THAT'S OKAY.

PETZOLDT:
THIS IS WHERE I GREW UP AND THIS IS WHERE I'VE LIVED.  AND I
GUESS THIS IS WHERE I'LL COME BACK TO AND SPEND MY LAST DAYS,
LOOKING AT THE GRAND TETON.

REICHERT:
AND THEN THERE ARE THOSE WHO ADMIT THAT THE BEST THING ABOUT
MOUNTAINS IS JUMPING OFF OF THEM.

LIKE FRANK GILLETTE.

FRANK GILLETTE, GLIDER PILOT:
I'M ONE OF THOSE PEOPLE THAT LIKE TO COMPETE.  I NEVER FAKE IT. 
I GO AS HARD AS I CAN AND I GET AS HIGH AS I CAN.  

I HAVE TO HAVE SOMETHING IN MIND, SOME GOAL.  AND I PUSH THE
LIMITS, BECAUSE THAT'S WHEN I HAVE FUN.

REICHERT:
BUT WHEN GILLETTE FIRST STARTED FLYING GLIDERS, IN THE 1970'S, HE
WAS REALLY PUSHING THE LIMITS.  

GILLETTE:
TO BE DARN HONEST, IT WAS DANGEROUS.  WHAT WE CALLED A STANDARD
GLIDER DIDN'T HAVE THE SAFETIES BUILT INTO IT.  YOU GET IN ROUGH
AIR AND THE THING COULD JUST COLLAPSE.

REICHERT:
BUT FRANK "HUNG" IN THERE, AND FOUR YEARS AGO, AT THE AGE OF 64,
HE ACCOMPLISHED SOMETHING EVEN HE WASN'T EXPECTING.

ONE SUMMER DAY, JUST LIKE THIS GLIDER, HE TOOK OFF FROM ONE OF
THE HIGH BUTTES IN THE ARCO AREA.

EXCEPT FRANK KEPT GOING, AND GOING, AND GOING.

GILLETTE:
AND THEN WHEN I HIT THE CONTINENTAL DIVIDE, I WAS LOST.  I HAD
NEVER PLANNED TO GO THAT FAR.  MY RADIO HAD QUIT.  I HAD LOST
CONTACT WITH MY DRIVER.  I'M NOT TURNING BACK.  I HAD TO GO TO
THE BATHROOM, ALL THOSE THINGS.  I HAD A CRAMP IN MY LEG.  WE
KEPT GOING FOR 6 1/2 HOURS TOTAL.

REICHERT:
HE ENDED UP IN ANACONDA, MONTANA, 162 MILES AWAY.  IT WAS A NEW
STATE HANG GLIDING RECORD, ONE THAT STILL STANDS.

THAT'S NOT TO SAY FRANK HASN'T HAD CLOSE CALLS.  ONCE HE WAS
SUCKED UP INTO A THUNDERCLOUD.

GILLETTE:
I WAS TOTALLY IN DARKNESS, AND IT STARTED BUILDING ICE ON US.  I
HAD A COMPASS THAT, IT WAS SPINNING SO BAD.  IT WAS A BALL
COMPASS.  THEY'RE NOT STABLE AND IT WAS SPINNING.  I COULDN'T
EVEN HOLD A DIRECTION.

REICHERT:
AT 18,500 FEET, FRANK MANAGED TO FIND AN OPENING.

GILLETTE:
AND I FLEW RIGHT OUT OF THE TOP OF IT.  FLEW INTO CLEAR, SMOOTH
AIR.  SUNSHINE, SEE ALL THESE CLOUDS ALL OVER.  BEAUTIFUL SIGHT. 
OF COURSE, I WAS SCARED TO DEATH.  I'D NEVER BEEN SO SCARED IN
ALL MY LIFE.

AND I SWORE I'D NEVER FLY AGAIN.

AND I DIDN'T FOR THREE DAYS.

CLAIR PACKER, GLIDER PILOT:
I DON'T THINK I KNOW ANYBODY THAT LOVED TO FLY AS MUCH AS FRANK
DOES.  IF IT FLIES, I BELIEVE FRANK WOULD FLY IT.

REICHERT:
LIKE THIS KIT FOX AIRPLANE, WHICH HE FLIES RIGHT FROM HIS YARD.

GILLETTE:
THE THRILL OF FLYING IS BAR NONE.  I DON'T KNOW WHAT ELSE YOU
COULD FIND THAT WOULD BE BETTER.

REICHERT:
AND FRANK SHARES THAT LOVE WITH A YOUNGER GENERATION OF GLIDERS. 

EVERY YEAR HE HOLDS A FLY-IN ON NEARBY MOUNT HARRISON.  IT
ATTRACTS DOZENS OF GLIDERS, INCLUDING NATIONAL CHAMPIONS.

VALERIE CARROLL, GLIDER PILOT:
NOT ONLY DOES HE LOVE TO FLY, HE LOVES TO SEE EVERYONE ELSE
FLYING AND ENJOYING IT AND HAVING A GOOD TIME.

REICHERT:
THE WEEKEND IS CAPPED OFF WITH A TOUCHDOWN AT FRANK'S HOME NEAR
BURLEY, AND A BIG DINNER.

DINNER GUEST:
WE PLAY HARD, WE EAT GOOD.

REICHERT:
STILL, FLYING DOESN'T PAY THE MORTGAGE.  
THAT COMES FROM FARMING, WITH ITS DECIDEDLY EARTH-BASED, SLOWER
FORM OF TRAVEL.

GILLETTE:
AND WE'VE BEEN DOING ALRIGHT...FARMING HAS ITS REWARDS.

(ALARM SOUNDS) 

DON'T ASK ME WHAT THAT IS.

YOU SEE THAT STRAW IS A LITTLE GREEN.  THAT DIDN'T HELP ANYTHING.

REICHERT:
BUT A FEW FLIGHTS WILL PUT IT ALL IN PERSPECTIVE.

GILLETTE:
WHEN YOU'RE BUSY AND GOT A LOT OF THINGS ON YOUR MIND, GO FLYING. 
AND YOU CAN'T THINK OF THOSE THINGS AND FLY AT THE SAME TIME. 
AND I FOUND IT A RELAXING THING.

REICHERT:
AT NEARLY 70, FRANK HAS MADE A FEW CONCESSIONS TO AGE.  HE USES A
PARAGLIDER NOW INSTEAD OF A HANGGLIDER, BECAUSE IT'S LIGHTER AND
MORE MANEUVERABLE.

BUT HE'LL NEVER STOP AIMING TO GET HIGHER AND FARTHER.

GILLETTE:
I FEEL GOOD.  I MEAN, I'M HAPPY EVERY DAY THAT I GET UP THAT I'M
STILL ABLE TO DO WHAT I'M DOING.  SO I'M GOING TO DO IT AS LONG
AS I CAN.

REICHERT:
HORACE HENDERSON HAS A DECIDEDLY DIFFERENT ATTITUDE ABOUT TRAVEL. 
AND AT 86, HE'S NOT ABOUT TO CHANGE HIS MIND ANYTIME SOON.

FROM THE BEGINNING HENDERSON KNEW WHERE HE BELONGED.  IT WAS ON
THE BACK OF A HORSE.

HORACE HENDERSON, RAWHIDE ARTIST:
I CAN'T REMEMBER WHEN I FIRST STARTED RIDING.  I THINK I STARTED
RIDING ABOUT THE TIME I STARTED WALKING.  ALL I KNEW WAS SADDLE
HORSES AND COWS AND COWBOYS.  I THOUGHT THAT'S WHAT THE WORLD
CONSISTED OF.  

REICHERT:
SOME FOLKS REFUSE TO GIVE UP THEIR TIES TO A BYGONE ERA.  AND
HENDERSON IS ONE OF THEM.

FOR OVER 70 YEARS HE HAS SOUGHT TO MASTER THE ARCANE ART OF
RAWHIDE BRAIDING.  IT'S HIS ONE CONNECTION TO THE WORLD OF THE
COWBOY.

HENDERSON:
IT'S AN OLD COWBOY CRAFT THAT'S JUST ABOUT DIED OUT.  THE COWBOYS
IN MY TIME DIDN'T GET TO TOWN BUT ABOUT ONCE A YEAR, MAYBE NOT
THAT OFTEN.  SO, THEY MADE EVERYTHING FROM RAWHIDE THAT THEY
COULD.  RAWHIDE IS UNTANNED COWHIDE.  IT'S JUST EXACTLY WHAT THE
WORD IMPLIES.  IT IS RAW HIDE, IT IS NOT TANNED IN ANY WAY.  IT
JUST HAS THE HAIR TAKEN OFF, THAT'S ALL.

MOST COWBOYS TODAY RIDE WITH LEATHER REINS.  THEY DON'T USE
BRAIDED REINS.  AND OF COURSE THE RODEO COWBOY, HE'S A DIFFERENT
KIND OF AN ANIMAL ALL TOGETHER.  HE'S NOT A COWBOY IN MY BOOK. 
BUT ANYWAY, THEY NEVER WORK ONLY IN A FLAT ARENA.  WHERE'S IF YOU
TAKE HIM OUT HERE ON THE HILLSIDE AND THE RIMROCKS, HE WOULDN'T
GET VERY FAR.  HE'D CHICKEN OUT PRETTY QUICK, I THINK.

YOU'VE GOT TO HAVE A DEEP DESIRE TO DO THIS TO BE GOOD AT IT.  IF
YOU DON'T YOU'LL NEVER GET TO BE GOOD AT IT.  BUT, I WOULDN'T SAY
I'M THE BEST BY FAR, BUT I'M NOT THE WORST EITHER.

AND THIS IS A FINISHED PRODUCT - A QUIRT THAT A COWBOY MIGHT USE. 
AND IT DIDN'T TAKE TOO LONG TO MAKE.  I THINK ABOUT THREE OR FOUR
DAYS I HAD PROBABLY FINISHED THAT ONE.  BUT THIS ONE, THIS IS A
SHOW QUIRT AND IT'S, I EXPECT I HAD 60 HOURS TIME IN IT.  BUT
THERE IS A LOT OF WORK WENT INTO THAT.  THERE'S 50 STRANDS A
GOING AROUND THIS HANDLE HERE.

REICHERT:
HENDERSON SAYS HIS BEST WORK IS BEHIND HIM, THAT HIS EYESIGHT
ISN'T WHAT IT USED TO BE.  HIS DAYS IN THE SADDLE ARE JUST ABOUT
OVER TOO, ALTHOUGH HE STILL OCCASIONALLY HELPS HIS NEIGHBOR ROUND
UP HIS CATTLE.

BUT LIKE MOST OLD COWBOYS, HE STILL YEARNS FOR THE FREEDOM OF
THAT BYGONE ERA.

HENDERSON:
I DO.  YOU BET I DO.  I CAN JUST GO OUT THERE AND STAY.  IF
PEOPLE WOULD JUST LEAVE ME ALONE, I'D DO FINE.

ONE GUY SAID, "AH", HE SAID, "THAT OLD GUY HENDERSON, HE'S HALF
COYOTE AND HALF INJUN."  HE SAID, "ALL HE WANTS TO DO IS RUN
AROUND OUT HERE IN THE BRUSH AND EAT HUCKLEBERRIES AND FISH."  

I DON'T KNOW BUT HE WAS ABOUT HALF RIGHT.

OLIVE PURCELL, COWPUNCHER:
WAY UP THERE!  YOU CAN HEAR!  WAY HIGH!

REICHERT:
OLD HORACE HENDERSON MIGHT JUST FIND A KINDRED SPIRIT IN OLIVE
PURCELL.

FOR 25 YEARS, OLLIE, AS SHE'S KNOWN, HAS BEEN IN CHARGE OF THIS
SAME HERD OF COWS NEAR HELLS CANYON.

PURCELL:
WELL, THEY KNOW ME.  THE CATTLE, YOU KNOW.  I'LL SEE AN OLD COW
AND IT'S, "WHERE YOU BEEN?  I HAVEN'T SEEN YOU IN A WEEK OR TWO." 
IT'S JUST, YOU KNOW, THAT'S JUST THE WAY I TALK TO THEM.

GO ON.  GET UP OUT OF HERE.

REICHERT:
OLLIE'S ALWAYS LOVED COWS AND WORKING OUTDOORS.  WHEN SHE WAS
JUST A TEENAGER, SHE DROPPED OUT OF SCHOOL TO BE WHERE SHE FELT
SHE REALLY BELONGED.

PURCELL:
'CAUSE MY MIND WAS ALWAYS OFF SOMEWHERES ELSE.  I DIDN'T WANT TO
GO TO SCHOOL.  GOING TO GRADE SCHOOL WASN'T TOO BAD.  BUT THAT
YEAR I WENT TO HIGH SCHOOL, THAT WAS CLEAR OUT OF MY ELEMENT.

SEE, I'D NEVER BEEN IN TOWN.

REICHERT:
SO SHE STAYED IN THE WILDS, AND GAINED A REPUTATION AS A HARD
WORKING RANCHHAND, ONE WHO WOULD MAKE SURE ANY PREDATOR WAS
QUICKLY KILLED.

PURCELL:
MAINLY I JUST LIKE TO STAY ALONE, ALWAYS DID.  IF I WANT TO JERK
MY SHIRT OFF AND WASH MY FACE CLEAR DOWN TO MY BELT, I'M ALONE,
NOBODY THERE TO WATCH.

REICHERT:
AND NOBODY TO HEAR.  OLIVE, BY HER OWN ADMISSION, CAN USE SOME
PRETTY SPICY LANGUAGE WITH HER ANIMALS.

PURCELL:
YEAH, I'VE GOT, A LOT HAVE GOT NAMES.  SOME OF THEM YOU CAN
REPEAT.  

"YOU OLD WITCH!" 

KENNETH SEID, RANCHER:
SHE'S JUST DIFFERENT THAN MOST OTHER PEOPLE.

REICHERT:
KEN SEID HAS BEEN OLIVE'S BOSS SINCE 1972.

SEID:
THERE'S A LOT OF TIMES I MIGHT NOT SEE HER FOR TWO WEEKS AT A
TIME BUT, I KNOW THAT SHE'S DOING WHAT SHOULD BE DONE AND DOING
IT RIGHT.

REICHERT:
A WHILE BACK, OLLIE TOLD SEID THAT SHE WAS THINKING OF RETIRING. 
SO SEID HIRED ANOTHER WOMAN TO START TRAINING UNDER HER.  SOMEHOW
THOUGH, OLLIE HASN'T FOUND THE TIME TO LEAVE.
PURCELL:
WELL, THE MAIN REASON IS I'VE GOT LIVESTOCK TO TAKE CARE OF.  AND
I DON'T LIKE TO HAVE SOMEBODY ELSE HAVE TO COME AND DO IT.  

SEID:
WELL, IF I'D LET HER, SHE'D WORK EVERY DAY OF THE YEAR AND FROM
DAYLIGHT 'TIL DARK.

REICHERT:
FIFTEEN HOUR DAYS ARE PUNCTUATED BY A QUICK MEAL AT THE COW CAMP,
AN OLD BUNK HOUSE WITH NO ELECTRICITY.  THEN IT'S BACK TO WORK.

PURCELL:
I REALLY DIDN'T EXPECT TO BE HERE THIS LONG.  NOT THAT I DIDN'T
WANT THE JOB THAT LONG, IT'S JUST THAT I JUST REALLY DIDN'T
EXPECT TO BE ABLE TO DO IT THAT LONG.

REICHERT:
WHAT WILL EVENTUALLY KEEP HER FROM DOING HER JOB SHE SAYS ARE
ENVIRONMENTALISTS, WHO SHE FEELS DON'T APPRECIATE WHAT SHE DOES.

PURCELL:
THEY THINK THIS PUBLIC LAND SHOULD BE EVERYBODY SHOULD USE IT AND
I AGREE WITH THEM.  THEY SHOULD.  BUT THERE SHOULD BE A HAPPY IN
BETWEEN.

YOU GIVE A LITTLE AND I'LL GIVE A LITTLE.  AND THE COW MAN'S BEEN
HAVING TO HAVE TO GIVE AN AWFUL LOT.

REICHERT:
THE TRADITION OF THE COW WOMAN THOUGH, IS STILL HOLDING ON IN
THIS OPERATION, AS OLLIE PASSES ON HER KNOWLEDGE TO THE YOUNGER
GENERATION.

FAWN MUNRO, TRAINEE:
I'M LIVING MY DAD'S DREAM LIFE.  HE WOULD LOVE TO BE ABLE TO DO
THIS FOR A LIVING.  AND I FEEL THAT I'M GETTING TO PARTAKE IN
SOMETHING THAT JUST ISN'T GOING TO BE THERE TEN YEARS DOWN THE
ROAD.

REICHERT:
EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE, OLLIE CAN BE COAXED INTO TOWN.  TODAY,
FRIENDS TURNED OUT TO SURPRISE HER ON HER 70TH BIRTHDAY.

DWIGHT MADDOX, RANCHER:
SHE'S GREAT.  I MEAN, I NEVER KNOWED ANYBODY LIKE HER.  THERE'S A
LOT OF MEN WHO COULDN'T TAKE HER PLACE, I'LL GUARANTEE IT.  SHE
CAN SHOE HORSES, SHE CAN DO ANYTHING.

REICHERT:
AND THAT'S WHY, AS SOON AS SHE CAN, OLLIE WILL GO BACK TO THE
PEACE AND QUIET OF HER COW CAMP.  A VISIT WITH HER KITTENS, A FEW
GAMES OF SOLITAIRE AND SHE'S READY FOR ANOTHER DAY.

MUNRO:
HER LIFE ARE HER COWS.  AND SHE STARTS EVERYDAY AND SHE DOESN'T
REALLY PLAN ON DOING ANYTHING BUT COWS.

PURCELL:
I WATCH THESE PEOPLE, EDUCATED PEOPLE, WITH THEIR JOBS, THEY SO
WANT TO SEE FRIDAY COME SO BAD SO THEY CAN GET AWAY.  AND THAT
JUST DON'T APPEAL TO ME AT ALL.  I NEVER WANTED TO GET FAMOUS.  I
NEVER WANTED TO GET RICH.  I JUST WANT TO GET ALONG.



"OH, THE LIGHT IS JUST SPECTACULAR."

REICHERT:
NO MATTER HOW TIRED SHE GETS, YOU PROBABLY WON'T FIND OLIVE
PURCELL DOING YOGA.

BUT THESE OLD BROADS LOVE TO START THEIR DAY THIS WAY.  

HEY, THAT'S WHAT THEY CALL THEMSELVES!

DOTTIE FOX, GREAT OLD BROADS FOR WILDERNESS:
WELL, I JUST THINK IT'S CATCHY, BECAUSE OLD BROADS, USUALLY YOU
THINK OF IT AS A DEROGATORY TERM.  BUT YOU GET TO A CERTAIN POINT
AND YOU DON'T REALLY CARE.

REICHERT:
SEVENTY-SIX YEAR OLD DOTTIE FOX IS A CHARTER MEMBER OF THE
ORGANIZATION, WHOSE FULL NAME IS "THE GREAT OLD BROADS FOR
WILDERNESS."

IT'S A HIKING GROUP THAT'S JUST AS MUCH ABOUT POLITICS AS IT IS
ABOUT PEAKS.

FOX:
THIS IS FOCUSED STRICTLY ON OLDER WOMEN WHO REALLY LOVE TO BE OUT
IN THE WILDERNESS AND ARE WILLING TO GO TO BATTLE FOR IT.

REICHERT:
THE GROUP WAS FOUNDED IN 1989 BY SUSAN TIXIER, AN ENVIRONMENTAL
ACTIVIST AND GRANDMOTHER.

SHE WAS PROMPTED BY THE FEELING THAT SOME POLITICIANS WERE USING
OLDER PEOPLE AS AN EXCUSE TO VOTE AGAINST CREATING MORE
WILDERNESS.

SUSAN TIXIER, GREAT OLD BROADS FOR WILDERNESS:
ONE OF THE STATEMENTS THAT POLITICIANS ALWAYS FALL BACK ON, THEY
SAY, "WELL, WILDERNESS LOCKS IT UP AND BECAUSE THERE ARE NOT
ROADS IT KEEPS THE ELDERLY FROM ACCESSING THE WILDERNESS."  AND
OBVIOUSLY THAT WASN'T TRUE BECAUSE I WAS OLDER AND HIKED WITH
OLDER WOMEN.

REICHERT:
THE GROUP NOW HAS OVER 1000 MEMBERS.  EACH YEAR THEIR ANNUAL
CONFERENCE IS IN A DIFFERENT WESTERN AREA.

THERE THEY HIKE AND LEARN MORE ABOUT THE CHALLENGES FACING THE
REGION.

THIS YEAR THEY'VE COME TO THE KETCHUM AREA, AND TODAY A GROUP IS
BEING LED INTO THE BOULDER WHITE CLOUD MOUNTAINS BY A
REPRESENTATIVE OF THE IDAHO CONSERVATION LEAGUE.

SHE ENCOURAGES THEM TO PUSH FOR MORE WILDERNESS HERE.

LINN KINCANNON, IDAHO CONSERVATION LEAGUE:
THIS AREA SHOULD BE DESIGNATED FOR WILDERNESS.  IT'S BEEN
PROPOSED FOR DESIGNATION BY CONSERVATIONISTS FOR THE LAST 20
YEARS.

REICHERT:
AND THE GREAT OLD BROADS AREN'T AFRAID TO USE THE POLITICAL
PROCESS TO MAKE THAT HAPPEN.

TIXIER:
WE'VE GONE TO WASHINGTON ON A COUPLE OF OCCASIONS, AND WE HAVE
HIKED THE HILL AND TALKED TO CONGRESSPEOPLE, AND WE HAVE TOLD
THEM THAT IF THEY DON'T VOTE FOR WILDERNESS WE'RE GOING TO TELL
THEIR MOTHERS, WHICH WE THOUGHT WAS VERY HUMOROUS AND PROBABLY
ONE OF THE WAYS THEY HAVE NOT BEEN LOBBIED BEFORE.

FOX:
ALL YOU HAVE TO DO IS MENTION THE NAME "GREAT OLD BROADS FOR
WILDERNESS" AND THEY WANT TO KNOW WHAT IT IS.  SO THE NAME IS
GREAT.  SO I, AND I SIGNED UP A FEW OF THEIR MOTHERS.

JOAN PROCTOR, GREAT OLD BROADS FOR WILDERNESS:
I ALWAYS GO BACK TO THE FACT THAT WE CALL THIS MOTHER EARTH, YOU
KNOW, WE CALL THIS MOTHER NATURE.  I MEAN, WHAT BETTER WAY THAN
FOR WOMEN TO BE WORKING TOWARD SAVING IT?

REICHERT:
AND COMPROMISE ISN'T PART OF THEIR VOCABULARY.  FOR THEM, THE
WILDERNESS SHOULD BE AS CLOSE AS POSSIBLE TO THE WAY IT ONCE WAS.

FOX:
WE DON'T WANT ROADS, WE DON'T WANT MECHANIZED VEHICLES, WE DON'T
WANT MOTORBIKES, WE DON'T WANT MOUNTAIN BIKES.

REICHERT:
THEY KNOW THAT SOME FOLKS LABEL THAT RADICAL.  BUT FOR JOAN
PROCTOR AND THE REST OF THE GROUP, THEIR POSITIONS JUST COME
NATURALLY.

PROCTOR:
I JUST DON'T FEEL RADICAL AT ALL.  I THINK RADICAL WOULD BE
MAKING CHANGES IN SOMETHING THAT'S ALREADY THERE AND BEAUTIFUL
AND DESTROYING IT.  TO ME THAT'S RADICAL.

TIXIER:
WE DON'T TRY TO NEGOTIATE OR BE CLEVER.  WE JUST WANT MORE AND
ALL OF THE WILDERNESS THAT DESERVES TO BE DESIGNATED.

MAYBE IT'S A PULL WAY TO THE LEFT THAT NOBODY ELSE CAN AFFORD TO
TAKE, BUT WHO'S GOING TO STAND UP TO YOUR GRANDMOTHER AND SAY
COMPROMISE?  I MEAN, WOULD YOU ASK YOUR GRANDMOTHER TO
COMPROMISE?

FOX:
WE'RE THE ONLY COUNTRY IN THE WORLD THAT HAD THE FORESIGHT TO SET
ASIDE WILDERNESS AREAS, SO THIS IS VERY SPECIAL.  AND IT IS JUST
INCREDIBLE THAT THOSE IDIOTS IN CONGRESS DON'T FEEL THE SAME WAY.

WE CAME FROM WILDERNESS AND I THINK IT'S IN OUR ROOTS, I THINK
IT'S IN OUR SPIRIT, OUR SOUL.  AND I THINK WE'VE LOST THAT, BUT I
STILL FEEL IT VERY STRONGLY.

REICHERT:
"WE DO NOT COUNT A MAN'S YEARS UNTIL HE HAS NOTHING ELSE TO
COUNT."  SO WROTE THE PHILOSOPHER RALPH WALDO EMERSON.  THE MEN
AND THE WOMEN THAT YOU'VE MET TONIGHT ARE ANYTHING BUT OLD.  SURE
THEY HAVE ACHES AND PAINS AND SOME OF THEM MAY BE SLOWING DOWN. 
BUT THEIR LOVE OF THE OUTDOORS GIVES THEM A REFUGE FROM THESE
MUNDANE CARES.  AND THEIR ENTHUSIASM FOR SHARING THAT LOVE WITH
OTHERS MEANS THAT WE'RE ALL ENRICHED BY THEIR PASSION.

THANKS FOR WATCHING.  WE'LL SEE YOU NEXT TIME.

FRANK GILLETTE:
YOU'RE NO OLDER THAN YOU FEEL.  YOU'RE NO OLDER THAN YOU FEEL.

PAUL PETZOLDT:
IT'S WONDERFUL TO RIDE UP TO THE TOP OF HERE, AND THEN YOU GO
AROUND THIS PEAK, OR YOU CAN RAPPEL OFF A CLIFF.

DOTTIE FOX:
FROM A PHYSICAL STANDPOINT, IT'S USE IT OR LOSE IT.  SO, YOU
KNOW, ALL THESE OLD FOLKS OUGHT TO GET OFF THEIR CHAIRS AND GET
OUT THERE AND START WALKING.

HORACE HENDERSON:
I THINK I WAS BORN ABOUT 100 YEARS TOO LATE.  

PURCELL:
YOU'VE HEARD OF THESE PEOPLE THAT HAVE WORKED NINE TO FIVE?  I
WORK FIVE TO NINE.

I'LL BREAK THAT THING!

     
OUTDOOR IDAHO NOW HAS A WEB PAGE.  FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THIS
PROGRAM AND OTHER OUTDOOR IDAHO SHOWS, CONTACT US ON THE WORLD
WIDE WEB.


CLOSED CAPTIONING TRANSCRIPTION BY KELLY ROBERTS.