OUTDOOR IDAHO
                            THE HUNT


BRUCE REICHERT, HOST:
TO SOME IT'S A SACRED ACT, A SHARED ACTIVITY THAT ALLOWS US TO
PASS ON IMPORTANT TRADITIONS.

A RITUAL THAT PERMITS HUMANS TO PARTICIPATE IN THE LIFE AND DEATH
CYCLES OF THE NATURAL WORLD.

RON SPOMER:
LOOK AT MY EYES.  THEY'RE IN FRONT OF MY HEAD, BIFOCAL VISION, AS
ALL PREDATORS HAVE, LIKE WOLVES AND CATS.

REICHERT:
BUT INCREASINGLY, HUNTING HAS BECOME A RITUAL THAT NEEDS
DEFENDING.  IN STATE AFTER STATE THROUGHOUT THE WEST, HUNTERS ARE
FINDING THEMSELVES OUTNUMBERED AND OUTGUNNED.

PROF. JOHN FREEMUTH:
I DON'T THINK HUNTERS CAN ASSUME THAT THEY HAVE THE HIGH MORAL
GROUND AND THE CLEAR MAJORITY POSITION; THEY NEED TO WORK.  IF
HUNTERS AREN'T PASSING ON THE HUNTING TRADITION, YOU'VE GOT A
DEMOGRAPHIC TRAIN WRECK COMING.

REICHERT:
WHAT IS IT ABOUT HUNTING THAT IS WORTH PRESERVING?

TED KERASOTE:
WHEN YOU HUNT YOU BECOME PART OF THAT TIMELESS, AND IN A WAY,
MAPLESS COUNTRY THAT WAS THE ORIGINAL WORLD. 

ANN REGAN:
IT'S THE HUNT THAT I'M OUT THERE FOR.  IT'S THE EXPERIENCE OF THE
OUTDOORS AND THE WILDLIFE.  I WOULDN'T TRADE IT FOR ANYTHING.

MARK REGAN:
THE MOST EXCITING THING YOU'LL EVER HAVE IS A 800 POUND ANIMAL
STANDING 10 YARDS FROM YOU LOOKING TO FIGHT.  AND THAT'S WHAT'S
HOOKED US.  

LARRY W. JONES:
I DON'T REALLY KNOW WHAT DRIVES A PERSON THAT LOVES ANIMAL SO
MUCH TO KILL THEM.  I WENT OUT HERE AND NO ONE'S AROUND SO I
WHISTLED AND HE COME RUNNING DOWN OFF THE MOUNTAIN.  RUN RIGHT,
JUMPED THE FENCE, COME RUNNING UP TO ME LIKE, "YEAH BOSS", YOU
KNOW.  YEAH, I CAN'T HELP IT.  I MEAN I JUST, I JUST WORRY ABOUT
HIM.

REICHERT:
OUTDOOR IDAHO TAKES TO THE HILLS TO EXPLORE THE MANY ISSUES
SURROUNDING "THE HUNT."

THE URGE TO KILL A WILD ANIMAL.  ANTHROPOLOGISTS TELL US THAT
IT'S FUNDAMENTAL TO HUMAN NATURE.  AND YET FOR MANY HUNTERS, THE
CHASE IS THE THING.  THE WILD GAME MERELY THE REMINDER OF THE
PLEASURE EXPENDED IN THE EFFORT.

HI, I'M BRUCE REICHERT, AND WELCOME TO OUTDOOR IDAHO.

YOU KNOW, MOST HUNTERS NEVER THINK ABOUT WHY THEY HUNT.  THEY
JUST DO IT.  THEY'VE BEEN DOING IT FOR YEARS AND THEY FRANKLY
CAN'T UNDERSTAND WHY ANYONE WOULD OBJECT.  BUT WHEN YOU PUT THEM
ALL TOGETHER, ALL THE ELK HUNTERS AND DEER HUNTERS AND BIRD
HUNTERS, THE SIMPLE FACT REMAINS THAT HUNTERS ARE A DISTINCT
MINORITY IN AN ACTIVITY THAT HAS BECOME INCREASINGLY
CONTROVERSIAL.

IT'S SEPTEMBER IN GRAND TETON NATIONAL PARK AND TED KERASOTE IS
IN HIS ELEMENT.  AN ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER FOR "SPORTS AFIELD" AND
AN AUTHOR OF A BOOK ON HUNTING, KERASOTE HAS SPOTTED A BULL ELK
WITH ITS HAREM OF COWS.

TED KERASOTE, HUNTER AND AUTHOR:
WE'RE WATCHING THIS SIX POINT BULL ELK HERD HIS HAREM OF COWS. 
HIS AIM OF COURSE IS TO PASS ALONG HIS OWN GENES AND SO HE WANTS
TO PROTECT HIS COWS FROM BEING STOLEN BY SOME OTHER BULL.  

WHEN YOU HEAR THE BULL ELK BUGLE AS WE HAVE THIS MORNING, IT'S A
WAY OF DISPLAYING HIS POWER AND SIZE TO OTHER BULL ELK.  ALSO YOU
WILL NOTICE BULL ELK OFTEN NOD THEIR HEAD BACK AND FORTH AND IT'S
A WAY THAT OTHER ELK AT A DISTANCE CAN TELL HOW BIG THEIR ANTLERS
ARE BY THE ARC THAT THE TIP OF THE ANTLER DESCRIBES IN THE SKY. 
IN THIS WAY, ELK AVOID CONFRONTATION.  

WHAT IS INTERESTING IS SOMETIMES TO WATCH TWO SIX POINT BULL ELK
JUST LOCK ANTLERS AND PUSH AND SHOVE AND SQUEAL, SUDDENLY BREAK
APART AND ONE WILL LOOK AT THE OTHER ONE AND WHEEL AROUND AND RUN
AWAY, AS IF HE HAS DECIDED, "WELL, THAT IS ENOUGH FOR TODAY.  I
DON'T WANT TO RISK ANYMORE."

REICHERT:
IN A FEW WEEKS, WHEN HUNTING SEASON OPENS, KERASOTE WILL TAKE HIS
RIFLE INTO NEARBY NATIONAL FOREST LAND AND WILL ATTEMPT TO END
THE LIFE OF ONE OF THESE 800 POUND ANIMALS.

KERASOTE:
THE ELK THAT WE'VE BEEN WATCHING, LIVE IN A SEAMLESS WORLD. THEY
LIVE TOTALLY WITHIN THE CYCLES THAT SUPPORT THEM AND MOVE THEM
FROM BIRTH TO DEATH.  

HUNTING BRINGS YOU FACE TO FACE WITH THE CYCLES THAT SUPPORT YOU. 
WHEN YOU GO OUT AND YOU TAKE THE LIVE OF A BIG BEAUTIFUL ANIMAL,
AS WE'VE SEEN, YOU CAN'T DENY ANY LONGER THAT LIFE, SOME LIFE HAS
TO DIE TO FEED OTHER LIFE.  AND YOU BECOME MUCH MORE PERSONALLY
RESPONSIBLE FOR IT.  

I THINK ALSO, YOU BECOME HUMBLE ABOUT YOUR PLACE IN THESE CYCLES. 
AND YOU ALSO DEVELOP A MORE HEIGHTENED SENSE OF COMPASSION FOR
ALL THE CREATURES THAT SHARE THE EARTH.  YOU CAN'T LIGHTLY CAUSE
HARM ANYMORE.

REICHERT:
WHY DO HUNTERS HUNT?  WHAT SATISFACTION COMES FROM TAKING THE
LIFE OF ANOTHER SENTIENT CREATURE?  

ROB YOUNG, WHO BUILDS BOWS OUT OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN JUNIPER
REINFORCED WITH THE TENDONS OF ANIMALS, DESCRIBES HIS FIRST DEER.

ROB YOUNG, BOW HUNTER:
IT WAS MORE OF A VISCERAL FEELING.  IT WAS SOMETHING THAT I
DIDN'T REALIZE WAS THERE UNTIL I ACTUALLY TOOK THE DEER AND THEN
ALL OF A SUDDEN THIS EMOTION JUST GUSHED OUT AND IT WASN'T, IT
WASN'T REMORSE FOR THE DEER.  I FELT NONE.  IT WAS MORE, AND IT
WASN'T A JUMPING UP AND DOWN, "OH I GOT THE DEER", IT WAS EXTREME
SATISFACTION.  

IT WAS, FINALLY IT, SORT OF A FEELING LIKE I CAME HOME.  

LARRY W. JONES, HUNTER AND AUTHOR:
AS MY KNOWLEDGE OF HUNTING CHANGED AND I BECAME A BETTER HUNTER,
I SET MY GOALS HIGHER.  INSTEAD OF JUST SHOOTING A DOE I WANTED
TO SHOOT A BUCK.  THEN AS I BECAME AS SUCCESSFUL AT SHOOTING
BUCKS I WANTED TO SHOOT MAYBE A THREE POINT OR A FOUR POINT.  

PROBABLY THE ULTIMATE CHALLENGE IS TO TAKE A VIDEO CAMERA OUT AND
TRY TO RECORD YOUR KILL.  AND THAT HAS BEEN A REAL CHALLENGE AND
MANY TIMES YOU DO A REALLY GOOD JOB OF HUNTING, YOU GET IN THE
RIGHT SPOT, BUT YOU RUN OUT OF JUICE IN THE BATTERIES OF YOUR
CAMERA OR THE GUY RUNS OUT OF TAPE AND OR THE CAMERAMAN CAN'T GET
THE SHOT.  

I LIKE PHOTOGRAPHING ANIMALS, TAKING VIDEO OF THEM, BUT I STILL
HAVE THE PREDATOR INSTINCT IN ME AND I LIKE TO GET AN ANIMAL ONCE
IN A WHILE.

HE'S A MASSIVE OLD BUCK, MASSIVE, MASSIVE. 

REICHERT:
FOR MANY HUNTERS, HUMILITY AND SACRIFICE ARE KEY ELEMENTS OF THE
HUNT.  BUT THE HUNTING TENT IS LARGE, LARGE ENOUGH TO ENCOMPASS
EVEN THE MASTER WHACKER HIMSELF, TED NUGENT, WHO EXHORTS HIS
AUDIENCE TO WHACK 'EM, STACK 'EM, AND PACK 'EM.

TED NUGENT, HUNTER AND ROCK STAR:
THIS IS JUST TOO COOL, YOU KNOW.  YOU GUYS, IF YOU DON'T HUNT, DO
YOURSELF A FAVOR, GET OUT OF THE MALLS, GET OFF THE STREET
CORNER, GET OUT OF THE CONCRETE JUNGLE, HAND TO HAND COMBAT, WAR
ZONE FROM BEYONDO EXTREMO, AND JOIN THE SPIRIT OF THE WILD.  THE
SPIRIT OF THE WILD IS, THE TED NUGENT SPIRIT OF THE WILD IS
STRONG AND FREE.  IT IS ALIVE AND WELL.  IT IS PERSONIFICATION OF
YOUR WILDEST, SENSUAL STIMULI.

REICHERT:
IN IDAHO, WILD ANIMALS LEGALLY BELONG TO THE PUBLIC, TO THE
STATE.  THOSE WISHING TO KILL BIG GAME ANIMALS CAN WITH THE
PROPER LICENSE, PERMITS, AND TAGS, HUNT DEER AND ELK, ANTELOPE,
MOUNTAIN GOATS AND BIG HORN SHEEP, MOUNTAIN LIONS AND MOOSE, AND
BLACK BEAR.

MANY HUNTERS WOULD AGREE THAT THE PREMIERE BIG GAME ANIMAL IN THE
WEST IS THE BULL ELK.  AND THE MOST EXCITING TIME TO HUNT IS IN
SEPTEMBER, DURING THE MATING SEASON.

MARK AND ANN REGAN ARE A DEADLY, EFFICIENT ELK HUNTING TEAM. 
THEY WORK TOGETHER USING A COMBINATION OF BUGLES AND COW CALLS,
ALWAYS STAYING DOWNWIND OF THE ANIMAL.

MARK REGAN, BOW HUNTER:
THIS IS SIX OR EIGHT MILES A DAY THROUGH STEEP MOUNTAINS CHASING
AN ELK THAT CAN OUTRUN YOU, WHILE HE'S WALKING AND YOU'RE
SPRINTING.

ANN REGAN, BOW HUNTER:
IT'S A CHALLENGE.  AND IF YOU'RE OUT THERE FOR THE KILLING,
YOU'RE OUT THERE FOR THE WRONG THINGS.  THE HUNT IS WHAT MAKES IT
FUN.

M. REGAN:
WE'RE TRYING TO GET HIM TO GO UP THE LOWER SIDE OF THIS RIDGE SO
ANN CAN GET A SHOT AT HIM AS HE COMES PAST.

A. REGAN:
A LOT OF TIMES THEY'LL COME IN AND NOT QUITE TO THE BUGLER, OR
THE CALLER, SO I MIGHT GET THE SHOT WHERE HE WOULDN'T COME ALL
THE WAY IN.

THAT CAN MAKE IT SOUND LIKE THERE'S A HERD.

M. REGAN:
WE NEED TO MOVE UP ABOUT 50 YARDS AND TRY TO GET CLOSER.

THEY'RE REALLY SMART, YET SOMETIMES THEY HAVE THEIR WEAK MOMENTS
AND YOU CAN FOOL THEM.  YOU MAY CALL 15 OR 20 DIFFERENT BULLS
BEFORE ONE WILL FINALLY GET STUPID AND TURN THE RIGHT WAY FOR
YOU.

A. REGAN:
I'M GLAD HE'S NOT COMPETITIVE AND WISHES THE WIFE WOULD STAY AT
HOME BECAUSE I WOULDN'T.  I WOULD GO WITHOUT HIM.

M. REGAN:
I'VE GOT A CONSTANT HUNTING PARTNER.  SHE CAN OUTWALK ME IN THE
HILLS, SHE CAN OUTRIDE ME ON A HORSE, BUT WE HAVE A GREAT TIME. 
I NEVER HAVE TO GO ALONE AND WE SHARE A LOT OF THE OUTDOORS
TOGETHER.

A. REGAN:
I THINK HE WAS RIGHT THERE.  I SAW HIM BELOW.  HE TOOK HIS COWS
AND RAN DOWN THE MOUNTAIN THERE.

M. REGAN:
AND THE WIND SHIFTED.  THE WIND PROBABLY GOT US.  LET'S GO DOWN
AROUND THE RIDGE RIGHT HERE AND SEE IF WE CAN SEE HIM.  IF NOT,
WE'LL TRY TO FIND ANOTHER ONE.

A. REGAN:
OKAY.

M. REGAN:
IT'S OUR LIFE.  IT'S WHAT WE EAT, DRINK, AND SLEEP.  EVERY LIVING
MINUTE WE'RE TALKING ABOUT IT, OR PLANNING FOR IT, OR WHATEVER WE
CAN DO TO GET UP IN THE HIGH COUNTRY.

REICHERT:
THIS YEAR, LESS THAN 15% OF THE STATE'S POPULATION WILL
PARTICIPATE IN THE HUNT.  AND SOME OF THEM, IT TURNS OUT, WOULD
PREFER NOT TO KILL AN ANIMAL.

NICK SANYAL, UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO:
WE CAN PUT HUNTERS INTO GROUPS, OR MARKET SEGMENTS.  EACH SEGMENT
SORT OF LOOKING FOR DIFFERENT NEEDS.  THE OLD IDEA WAS THAT ALL
HUNTERS WANTED THE SAME THING, A BIG TROPHY ANIMAL.  WE NOW KNOW
THAT SOME HUNTERS ARE APPALLED AT THE IDEA OF, THAT THEY MIGHT
ACTUALLY KILL SOMETHING AND HAVE TO PACK IT OUT.

REICHERT:
RESEARCH INTO THE HUNTERS' PSYCHE IS BECOMING AN IMPORTANT PART
OF WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT.  

SANYAL:
TEN YEARS AGO A LOT OF HUNTING SEASONS WERE SET USING BASICALLY
BIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS:  THE REPRODUCTIVE RATE OF A SPECIES, THE
CONDITION OF THE HERD.  

IN RECENT YEARS, THEY'VE LOOKED MORE AT WHAT TYPE OF ANIMALS DO
PEOPLE WANT TO HUNT:  IS IT FOR TROPHY OR IS IT FOR MEAT, IS IT
FOR THE THRILL OF THE CHASE.  AND TRYING NOW TO MANAGE THE
POPULATIONS WHO PRODUCE THOSE SORT OF ANIMALS AND THOSE SORT OF
OPPORTUNITIES.  AND SO TRY TO UNDERSTAND THE PERSON BEHIND THE
WEAPON REALLY, RATHER THAN THE ANIMAL IN FRONT OF THE WEAPON. 
IT'S SORT OF THE NEW APPROACH THAT THEY'RE TAKING.

DARRYL TONN, HUNTER AND STORE OWNER:
THERE ARE ABOUT 190 BUCKS LESS, SO THERE WOULD BE ABOUT 130.

REICHERT:
DARRYL TONN HAS SPENT MUCH OF HIS LIFE LEARNING ABOUT HIS FELLOW
HUNTERS AND ABOUT WILD GAME.  HIS MOSCOW, IDAHO HUNTING STORE IS
LINED WITH EXOTIC MOUNTS FROM TRIPS HE'S MADE TO OTHER
CONTINENTS.

TONN:
YOU GET A CHANCE TO TALK TO THE PEOPLE THAT LIVE THERE AND GET
THEIR POINT OF VIEW ON THE SITUATION IN THE WORLD TODAY.  THAT'S
WHAT HUNTING IS ALL ABOUT, IS SHARING A COMMON EXPERIENCE.

REICHERT:
HUNTING IS BIG BUSINESS AND THOUGH HE MAKES HIS LIVING SELLING
THE LATEST TECHNOLOGY, TONN BELIEVES HUNTERS RELY TOO MUCH ON
GADGETS.

TONN:
IT'S DRIVING US NUTS, INVENTORY IS.  I STARTED THIS STORE WITH
$4,000 CAPITAL.  RIGHT NOW, JUST TO CARRY ONE LEOPOLD SCOPE OF
EACH THAT THEY MAKE, AND I HAVE TO HAVE ABOUT $40,000 INVENTORY. 
HUNTERS IN GENERAL LIKE TO BUY GADGETS.  THEY ARE EQUIPMENT
FREAKS.  THEY DON'T, BASIC SKILLS ARE STILL WHAT COUNTS WHEN IT'S
OUT HUNTING, BUT A LOT OF PEOPLE DON'T HAVE THE TIME TO ACQUIRE
THOSE SKILLS, DON'T HAVE THE TRADITIONS.

REICHERT:
HE HAS STALKED THE WORLD'S MOST DANGEROUS ANIMALS; YET TONN WILL
TELL YOU THERE'S MORE EXCITEMENT PER HOUR IN HUNTING BIRDS THAN
IN HUNTING BIG GAME.  A SENTIMENT SHARED IN THE MAIN BY RON
SPOMER.

RON SPOMER, HUNTER AND AUTHOR:
YOU KNOW, ONCE YOU START HUNTING WITH A DOG, IT BECOMES SUCH AN
INTEGRAL PART OF THE HUNT THAT, YOU KNOW, I KNOW FELLOWS WHO WILL
GO OUT AND JUST MARVEL AT THE DOG AND ENJOY WATCHING WHAT THAT
DOG CAN DO, AND BIRDS ARE SECONDARY.  YOU KNOW, THE HUNT IS SO
MUCH DOG WORK THAT WHETHER OR NOT THEY GET GAME IS IMMATERIAL.

I LIKE THE IDEA OF MAN LIVING WITHIN HIS ENVIRONMENT, WITHOUT
PUTTING UNDUE PRESSURE ON IT.  IF I CAN SHOOT A DEER WITHIN
SHOUTING DISTANCE OF MY HOUSE, WHICH I'VE DONE, I'M WAY AHEAD OF
THE CURVE OF SHIPPING IT UP FROM IDAHO FROM THE BEEF PACKERS,
WRAPPING IT IN PLASTIC AND ALL THE ENERGY EXPENSES THAT GO IN
THAT.  SO I THINK I'M HAVING LESS OF AN IMPACT ON MY ENVIRONMENT
BY CONSUMING LOCALLY.

REICHERT:
SPOMER WRITES HUNTING BOOKS AS WELL AS AN OUTDOOR COLUMN FOR THE
"LEWISTON MORNING TRIBUNE."  

SPOMER:
IT SEEMS LIKE A DICHOTOMY, LOVING NATURE AND WANTING TO GET CLOSE
TO IT AND THEN YOU DESTROY IT WHEN YOU FIND IT.  BUT HUNTERS
KNOW, HUNTERS WHO HAVE BEEN OUT THERE AND ARE SERIOUS ABOUT THIS,
THEY KNOW THAT THEY ARE NOT DESTROYING NATURE, THEY'RE
PARTICIPATING WITH IT.

REICHERT:
LIKE MANY THOUGHTFUL HUNTERS, SPOMER WORRIES THAT AMERICANS ARE
LOSING THAT CONNECTION WITH NATURE, THAT EARLIER GENERATIONS ONCE
TOOK FOR GRANTED.

SPOMER:
IT IS EASY FOR NON-HUNTERS TO SEE THE EVIL SIDE OF DEATH.  WE'RE
NOT COMFORTABLE WITH DEATH IN THIS COUNTRY.  AND IT'S NOT
DIFFICULT TO ASSUME THAT WILD ANIMALS WE DON'T KNOW, FEEL THE
SAME SORTS OF EMOTIONS THAT WE FEEL AND FEAR DEATH AS WE DO.  I
DON'T BELIEVE THEY DO, BUT IT'S EASY TO THINK THAT.  

AND THEN IT IS EASY TO SAY, "I'M GOING TO CHOOSE BETWEEN GOOD AND
EVIL.  IS IT GOOD OR EVIL TO KILL AN ANIMAL?  WELL, IT SOUNDS
LIKE A PRETTY SIMPLE EQUATION.  IT'S AN EVIL THING TO DO.  WHY
DESTROY SOMETHING THAT IS WILD AND FREE?"  AND IT JUST DOESN'T
SEEM TO MAKE SENSE TO URBAN DWELLERS.  

SO HAVING LOST THIS CONNECTION, I THINK WE'RE RUNNING A RISK OF
LOSING THROUGH POLITICAL ACTION, VOTING, AND OUTLAWING, AND
SIMPLE THINGS, REGULATION LIKE THAT, I THINK WE'RE AT A GREAT
RISK OF LOSING OUR HUNTING HERITAGE.

REICHERT:
JUST WHAT IS OUR NATION'S HUNTING HERITAGE?  AFTER ALL, WASN'T IT
HUNTERS WHO SLAUGHTERED THE BUFFALO, WHO NEARLY DESTROYED THE
NATION'S HERDS OF DEER, AND ELK, AND MOOSE, AND PRONGHORN?

IT WAS PRECISELY BECAUSE OF SUCH ABUSES THAT TEDDY ROOSEVELT AND
OTHER LIKE MINDED HUNTERS FOUGHT TO CHANGE THE ETHICS SURROUNDING
THE SPORT, AND TO END MARKET HUNTING, THE COMMERCIAL SELLING OF
WILDLIFE.

ROOSEVELT ALSO HELPED TO CREATE THE BOONE AND CROCKETT CLUB, TO
ENCOURAGE CONDUCT THAT GIVES THE ANIMAL A FAIR CHANCE.

HIS CREDO OF FAIR CHASE SET A PATTERN FOR HUNTERS TO FOLLOW.

NINETY-TWO YEAR OLD AL KLOTS REMEMBERS A HUNTING TRIP FOR SAGE
GROUSE BACK IN THE 1920'S.

AL KLOTS, CONSERVATIONIST:
IT WAS JUST LIKE AN OPENING BARRAGE OF THE ARMY:  BANG, BANG,
BANG, BANG, SAGE HENS, SAGE HENS, SAGE HENS.  AND WE KEPT
THROWING THEM ON THE HAY RACK.  WE FINALLY GOT BACK TO THE HOUSE,
AND NOW THIS IS THE WAY IT WAS SUPPOSED TO BE, THERE WERE
LITERALLY THOUSANDS OF THESE SAGE HENS.  

WE GOT BACK TO THE HOUSE AND I WAS OUT AND A COUPLE OF THE
FELLOWS HAD THE SAGE HENS OUT AND THEY WERE PRESSING ON THEIR
BREASTS.  AND I SAID, "WHY ARE YOU DOING THAT?"  "WELL," HE SAID,
"IF THE BREAST IS HARD, WE THROW THEM AWAY BECAUSE THEY ARE
TOUGH.  WE JUST KEEP THE YOUNG ONES."  

THAT'S THE WAY IT WAS.  AND THAT'S ONE REASON WE'RE SHORT OF GAME
TODAY.

REICHERT:
AL KLOTZ AND HIS FRIEND, FORMER CONSERVATION OFFICER, MARSHALL
EDSON HELPED BRING REFORM TO THE MANAGEMENT OF IDAHO'S WILDLIFE.

KLOTZ:
IN THOSE DAYS WHEN, IF YOU HAD A DEMOCRATIC GOVERNOR, WHY ALL THE
GAME WARDENS, AND THAT'S WHAT THEY CALLED THEM IN THOSE DAYS,
WERE DEMOCRATIC GAME WARDENS, THEY WERE DEMOCRATS.  AND IF YOU
GOT A REPUBLICAN GOVERNOR, WHY ALL THE DEMOCRAT GAME WARDENS WENT
OUT, THEY WERE LET OUT AND THEN THEY HIRED REPUBLICAN GAME
WARDENS.  

AND THAT'S THE WAY IT WAS AND WE SPORTSMEN, AND I WAS A
SPORTSMAN, WE GOT VERY FED UP WITH THIS WHOLE THING AND WE TRIED
TO GET LEGISLATION IN, THROUGH THE LEGISLATURE TO SET UP A NON-
POLITICAL GAME DEPARTMENT.  BUT WE NEVER GOT ANY PLACE ON IT.  

AND FINALLY, IN ABOUT, WHEN WAS IT, ABOUT '38 OR '39, WHY
MARSHALL AND I AND SOME OF US WERE INVOLVED IN IT AND WE DECIDED
THE BEST THING TO DO WAS TO GET ENOUGH SIGNATURES AND TAKE IT TO
THE VOTE OF THE PEOPLE.  AND WE DID THAT.

MARSHALL EDSON, FORMER CONSERVATION OFFICER:
AS SOON AS IT CAME OUT OF POLITICS AS A PART OF THE LAW, IT SAID
THERE SHALL BE A MERIT SYSTEM ESTABLISHED FOR OUR TRAINED
PROFESSIONAL EMPLOYEES.  AND THEY'D TAKE EXAMINATIONS AND SO
FORTH.  SO I STARTED STUDYING MORE AND MORE AND TOOK THE
EXAMINATION AND DID QUITE WELL ON THE EXAM.  AND SO I WENT TO
WORK.  

IN MY WHOLE CAREER, I NEVER HAD ANYBODY, WHEN YOU ARRESTED THEM
OR HAD SOMETHING LIKE THAT, WHO SAID, "WELL I'LL SEE ABOUT
GETTING YOUR JOB FOR IT."  I NEVER HAD ANYBODY SAY THAT TO ME. 
ALTHOUGH, I HEARD IT HAD BEEN DONE.

REICHERT:
AS ONE OF SEVEN COMMISSIONERS APPOINTED BY THE GOVERNOR TO
OVERSEE THE STATE'S 60 YEAR OLD FISH AND GAME DEPARTMENT, KEITH
CARLSON HAS NOTICED A CHANGE IN THE PUBLIC'S ATTITUDE.

KEITH CARLSON, COMMISSIONER, FISH AND GAME DEPT.:
THE PUBLIC WANTS THE DEPARTMENT TO PROVIDE MORE AND MORE VARIED
SERVICES.  THE PUBLIC EXPECTS THAT WE WILL BE A LEADER IN
PROTECTING HABITAT, INCLUDING WATER QUALITY.  AND THOSE ARE THE
TOP THINGS THAT COME OUT EVERY TIME YOU TAKE A POLL OF WHAT THE
PUBLIC REALLY EXPECTS.  

AT THE SAME TIME, THE PUBLIC'S EXPECTING THAT WE'RE GOING TO TAKE
CARE OF MORE THAN JUST THE CRITTERS THAT WE HUNT AND FISH FOR,
NON-GAME, WILDLIFE DIVERSITY, WHATEVER YOU CALL IT.  THE PUBLIC
IS ASKING THAT WE PROVIDE MORE VIEWING OPPORTUNITIES, MORE BIRD
WATCHING, THINGS.  AND THESE ARE AREAS THAT WE TRADITIONALLY
HAVEN'T BEEN VERY ACTIVELY INVOLVED IN.

REICHERT:
THE FISH AND GAME DEPARTMENT DOES ACTIVELY MANAGE THE STATE'S BIG
GAME HERDS.  AND RECENTLY THE COMMISSION ADOPTED A BIOLOGICAL
STANDARD FOR IDAHO'S ELK: 10 BULLS FOR EVERY 100 COWS. 

BIOLOGISTS SAY THIS IS THE WAY TO IMPROVE THE HERDS.  BUT IT MAY
ALSO MEAN THE HUNTING OF FEWER BULLS BY RESIDENT AND NON-RESIDENT
HUNTERS.

CARLSON:
WE CAN'T ALL GO OUT EVERY YEAR AND SHOOT A SIX POINT BULL. 
SOMEHOW WE'RE GOING TO HAVE TO COME UP WITH A SOLUTION THAT'S
ACCEPTABLE TO THE PUBLIC, BOTH THE RESIDENT AND THE NON-RESIDENT
HUNTERS THAT HUNT IN IDAHO.  WE'VE GOT TO TRY AND DO IT WITHOUT
TOTALLY ELIMINATING THE OUTFITTING INDUSTRY IN THE STATE.  I
DON'T KNOW THAT ANY OF US ARE WISE ENOUGH TO REALLY BE ABLE TO DO
THAT.

REICHERT:
EACH YEAR HUNDREDS OF HUNTERS PARTICIPATE IN A SPECIAL KIND OF
EXPERIENCE; A GUIDED HUNT, GUIDED BY ONE OF THE STATE'S LICENSED
OUTFITTERS. 

DEAN MILLER, MANAGING EDITOR OF THE "IDAHO FALLS POST REGISTER",
DESCRIBES HIS FIRST GUIDED HUNT INTO THE WHITE CLOUD MOUNTAINS.

DEAN MILLER, ELK HUNTER:
IT WAS REALLY A TERRIFIC TRIP, JUST BY ANY ACCOUNT.  I MEAN IT
WAS A CAMPING TRIP THAT WAS A HUGE SUCCESS, BECAUSE WE WERE IN
GORGEOUS COUNTRY AND WE WERE WORKING WITH GOOD HORSES.  THAT'S
THE NICE THING ABOUT WORKING WITH OUTFITTERS.  

AND THEN THE FIFTH DAY OF THE TRIP THE OUTFITTER GOT ME IN
POSITION AND WE HAD BEEN WORKING THIS ONE RIDGE FOR THE WHOLE
WEEK ON AND OFF AND HAD SEEN A FEW BULLS THERE AND THEY NEVER
REALLY MOVED OUR DIRECTION, AND THAT MORNING THEY WERE.  

SO I RAN DOWN THIS RIDGE AND HE CAME ACROSS JUST BELOW ME AND I
DROPPED THIS SIX POINT BULL DOWN THE RIDGE AND EVERYTHING MY
FRIENDS HAD TOLD ME CAME TRUE.  YOU KNOW, THE MOMENT YOU SHOOT AN
ELK, ALL THE FUN STOPS.  YOU KNOW, IT'S ALL WORK.  

THE GUIDE AND I WORKED ON THAT BULL FOR SEVEN HOURS.  IT WAS A
PRETTY BULL.  IF YOU'VE SHOT AND KILLED A LARGE ANIMAL, IT'S HARD
NOT TO RECOGNIZE THE SERIOUSNESS OF WHAT YOU'VE DONE.  IT'S A
VERY SERIOUS MATTER.  

YOU'VE GOT 600 POUNDS OF MEAT LAYING ON THE GROUND AND YOU HADN'T
BETTER WASTE IT, YOU KNOW.  I KNOW WHEN WE WERE OUT THERE WERE A
FEW HUNTERS THAT KILLED BULLS IN THE SAME AREA WHERE WE WERE AND
LEFT, FOR INSTANCE, THE WHOLE RIB CAGE, TOOK JUST THE HIND
QUARTERS.  

I THINK PEOPLE LIKE THAT OUGHT TO BE PISTOL WHIPPED.  I MEAN, I
HAVE NO, ABSOLUTELY NO PATIENCE FOR PEOPLE LIKE THAT.  I THINK
OUR STATE LAWS ARE WAY TOO LAX ON PEOPLE WHO WASTE GAME.  

GIVEN THE FACT THAT IT'S A REALLY RARE EXPERIENCE, IT OUGHT TO BE
SAFE FOR PEOPLE WHO RESPECT IT, FOR PEOPLE WHO TAKE CARE OF IT.

REICHERT:
FOUR YEARS AGO SOMETHING HAPPENED TO THIS GARDEN VALLEY, IDAHO
HUNTER.  SOMETHING THAT CHANGED FOREVER THE WAY HE VIEWS THE
HUNT.  ELVIS PAID HIM A VISIT.

LARRY W. JONES:
THE FIRST YEAR I DIDN'T EXPECT HIM TO COME BACK.  BUT AT THE END
OF THE SECOND YEAR, HE HAD BEEN EATING OUT OF MY HAND, I JUST
WORRIED MYSELF SICK OVER HIM, YOU KNOW.  AND HE SHOWS UP THE END
OF THE SECOND YEAR, ABOUT THE FIRST PART OF DECEMBER.  AFTER
HUNTING SEASON IS OVER, HE SHOWED UP.  THE THIRD YEAR WAS
TRAUMATIC, YOU KNOW, I MEAN I WORRY ABOUT HIM EVERY YEAR.  SO HE
SHOWS UP THE THIRD YEAR AND THEN LAST YEAR, THE FOURTH YEAR.  AND
SO, YEAH, I CAN'T HELP IT.  I MEAN I JUST, I JUST WORRY ABOUT
HIM.

REICHERT:
JONES BEGAN SHOOTING AND MARKETING VIDEO OF HIS ENCOUNTERS WITH
ELVIS.  THEN HE BEGAN WRITING MUSIC.  

JONES:
I DIDN'T KNOW THIS BUT AN ELK ACTUALLY GRINDS THEIR TEETH.  IT
MAKES A POPPING NOISE AND THEN HE WOULD CURL HIS LIP.  SO, I TOLD
MY WIFE THAT'S, I NAMED HIM ELVIS.  I WENT OUT HERE AND NO ONE'S
AROUND SO I WHISTLED AND HE COME RUNNING DOWN OFF THE MOUNTAIN. 
RUN RIGHT, JUMPED THE FENCE, COME RUNNING UP TO ME LIKE, "YEAH,
BOSS", YOU KNOW.

REICHERT:
IT IS NOT AN EXAGGERATION TO SUGGEST THAT THIS WILD ANIMAL HAS
CHANGED JONES' LIFE.  

JONES:
I'VE BEEN A GET AFTER IT HUNTER MY WHOLE LIFE.  I'D TAKEN SIX ELK
IN SIX YEARS.  BUT LAST YEAR, FOR SOME REASON, I JUST DIDN'T HAVE
THE DRIVE THAT I WOULD NORMALLY HAVE AND I DIDN'T GET AN ELK LAST
YEAR.  THIS YEAR I DIDN'T EVEN BUY A TAG.  

I DON'T REALLY KNOW WHAT DRIVES A PERSON THAT LOVES ANIMALS SO
MUCH TO KILL THEM.  I REALLY ENJOY THIS CRITTER IN A BIG WAY AND
I WOULD MUCH RATHER TAKE PICTURES OF HIM AND ENJOY HIM LIKE THAT
THAN TO KILL HIM.  I COULDN'T KILL HIM FOR THE WORLD.

HE'S A NARROW ANTLERED SIX POINT.  IF HE'S AROUND THIS AREA, AND
ANYBODY KNOWS WHERE I'M AT, WELL, CUT HIM SOME SLACK.  THAT'S
WHAT I TELL THEM ON THE VIDEO.

REICHERT:
TO BE PART OF THE EMOTION AND MYSTERY OF THE GRAND CONFLICT OF
LIFE.  THAT IS THE APPEAL OF THE HUNT.  TO BE MORE THAN A MERE
OBSERVER.  SOME HAVE COMPARED HUNTING TO A RELIGIOUS RITE, IN
WHICH WE PAY HOMAGE TO WHAT IS DIVINE AND TRANSCENDENT IN THE
LAWS OF NATURE.  

HUNTING DOES ALLOW US THE OPPORTUNITY TO SLIP INTO A SEAMLESS,
TIMELESS WORLD, TO ACTIVELY PARTICIPATE IN THE SACRED CYCLES OF
LIFE.

THANKS FOR WATCHING.  WE'LL SEE YOU NEXT TIME.




CLOSED CAPTIONING TRANSCRIPTION BY KELLY ROBERTS.